For the Lady of Lowena: A Cornish Romance (Book Two), by Deborah M. Hathaway — A Review

From the desk of Katie Jackson:

Shakespeare once wrote, “O Fortune, Fortune! all men call thee fickle.” And it is the fickleness of friends, fame, and fortune that must be faced when they no longer prove faithful in the second book of the A Cornish Romance series, For the Lady of Lowena, by skilled storyteller Deborah M. Hathaway.

A Genuine Gentleman

Mr. Frederick Hawkins has purchased an estate in Cornwall, determined to enjoy a peaceful life near the sea and to marry an unpretentious country gentlewoman. He had been disillusioned by the disingenuous game-playing of the ladies in London.

“He didn’t want to marry just a ‘fine’ woman who cared more about her clothing than the thoughts and feelings of others. He was looking for someone different, someone real. A woman who was not afraid to be herself, especially with Society watching her.” (3)

When he meets a lovely and seemingly unaffected young lady on a Cornish beach, he is intrigued. But all is not as it seems.

A Lofty Lady

Miss Sophia Rosewall plays her part of coquettish, wealthy young woman well, always the recipient of admiration wherever she goes and convinced that she deserves it. One might accurately describe her as handsome, clever, and rich, with very little to distress or vex her. She has a fine dowry and has her pick of eligible gentlemen to choose from, and in her comfortable superiority, she cares not about anyone but herself.

Oh, How the Mighty Have Fallen

Stunning revelation: Sophia’s father has lost everything—their wealth, their status, their copper mine, their home—and Sophia is convinced that horrible Mr. Hawkins is fully to blame for the Rosewall family’s downfall. How dare he purchase the estate where her family has lived for generations? Appalling audacity! Now she must live in—surely temporary!—reduced circumstances at small and drafty Lowena Cottage while she attempts to find a swift solution for her pitiable situation.

“Did Miss Rosewall not realize how fortunate she was to not be living in the poor house? Was she so ungrateful to not even appreciate the fact that she had a roof over her head?

No, she was oblivious to it all.” (72)

Sophia strides onward with her characteristic selfishness until she can no longer avoid a harsh truth: to her Society friends, no money means no value.

“What was this feeling, insecurity? It was foreign. Unwelcome. She knew not how to be rid it.” (91)

In her acceptance of her circumstances, she is overwhelmed by her sudden inferiority.

“This was her new reality, being alone and forgotten. Being nothing.” (100)

With the help of some unlikely new friends, however, Sophia has the opportunity to gain the more altruistic perspective she has always lacked. But will she be willing to change?

Confrontations, Comeuppances, and Changes of Heart

The romance has a promising beginning, and that’s what kept me persevering through the parts of the story when the heroine was truly insufferable. She was realistically flawed, to be sure, and it was difficult to trudge through her viewpoint while she was being so insensitive and willfully ignorant and just generally unlikable. Not caring much for her did make the confrontations and comeuppances she faced all the more gratifying. And the contrast between her and the hero made him all the more sigh-worthy. I felt as though she didn’t deserve his goodness, but she did work to become more deserving, at least, and it was enjoyable to witness her eye-opening evolution. I also liked the glimpses of characters from the earlier books in the series; it’s always pleasurable to see how they are getting on once their time in the spotlight has ended.

In Conclusion

Historical romance admirers will enjoy the clean and sweet enemies-to-lovers journey in For the Lady of Lowena.  

4 out of 5 Stars


ADDITIONAL BOOKS IN THE SERIES

READ OUR PREVIOUS REVIEWS IN THE SERIES


FORTHCOMING REVIEWS

  • April 20—Near the Ruins of Penharrow: A Cornish Romance (Book 3)
  • May 25—In the Waves of Tristwick: A Cornish Romance (Book 4)
  • August 31—From the Fields of Porthlenn: A Cornish Romance (Book 5)
  • September 28—On the Shores of Tregalwen (A Cornish Romance Prequel)

BOOK INFORMATION

  • For the Lady of Lowena: A Cornish Romance (Book Two), by Deborah M. Hathaway
  • Draft Horse Publishing (September 19, 2019)
  • Trade paperback & eBook (338) pages
  • ISBN: 978-1733482004
  • Genre: Regency Romance, Historical Romance, Inspirational Fiction

ADDITIONAL INFO | ADD TO GOODREADS

We purchased a copy of the book for our own enjoyment. Austenprose is an Amazon affiliate. Cover image courtesy of Draft Horse Publishing © 2019; text Katie Jackson © 2022, austenprose.com.


Hello Dear Readers,

Have you read any of the novels in the A Cornish Romance series, or by Deborah M. Hathaway? If so, please share your thoughts.

If you enjoy historical romance with witty dialogue, engaging plots, and endearing characters, Austenprose highly recommends them. 

Drop us a line below and share your thoughts on this review and what you are currently reading! We would love to hear from you!

Laurel Ann Nattress, editor

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