Venetia (The Folio Society Edition), by Georgette Heyer — A Review

From the desk of Laurel Ann Nattress:

I will state unequivocally that Venetia is my favorite novel by author Georgette Heyer (1902-1974). That is quite an accolade considering the depth of her oeuvre including 26 Regency, 8 Georgian, 6 historical fiction, 4 contemporary, and 12 detective fiction novels. That’s 56 in total, and in my book, Venetia tops them all.

Ergo, it was no surprise to me that The Folio Society selected Venetia as their first Georgette Heyer book to trot out and showcase with their exquisite selection of beautifully bound and illustrated collector’s Continue reading “Venetia (The Folio Society Edition), by Georgette Heyer — A Review”

An Exclusive Q&A with Jennifer Kloester, Georgette Heyer’s Biographer

From the desk of Laurel Ann Nattress: 

My regular readers and friends will remember how much I admire and enjoy reading the Queen of Regency Romance, Georgette Heyer. We reviewed all her historical novels during a month-long celebration here on Austenprose in 2011.

While I continue to work through the long list of her books, there are scholars who have read them all and studied her life and work. The first among them is Dr. Jennifer Kloester. Austenprose reviewed her Georgette Heyer: A Biography of a Bestseller when it released in 2011 and have followed her career ever Continue reading “An Exclusive Q&A with Jennifer Kloester, Georgette Heyer’s Biographer”

12 Terrific Historical Christmas Novels and Short Story Collections for Your Holiday Reading

From the desk of Laurel Ann Nattress: 

It’s that time of year again when the holiday spirit takes hold and I am compelled to read Christmas stories in between shopping and baking. I especially appreciate short stories during this busy time and there are a lot of historical anthologies to choose from along with novellas, and novels to get me in the mood and distract me from the craziness at work and home. Here are twelve books in my personal collection set in Regency and Victorian times that Jane Austen and historical romance readers will devour. Be sure to add to them to your #TBRpile. You won’t regret it. Continue reading “12 Terrific Historical Christmas Novels and Short Story Collections for Your Holiday Reading”

Pistols for Two, by Georgette Heyer – A Review

From the desk of Laura A. Wallace:

Pistols for Two is a collection of eleven short stories first published in 1960.  Throughout her writing career, Heyer published her novels in serial form in various periodicals and published short stories in them as well.  This is the only collection published as a book; otherwise, her short stories exist only in old copies of the various magazines.  In researching her biography of Heyer, Jennifer Kloester tracked down Continue reading “Pistols for Two, by Georgette Heyer – A Review”

April Lady, by Georgette Heyer – A Review

From the desk of by Laura A. Wallace: 

Georgette Heyer’s April Lady is the last re-issue by Sourcebooks of Heyer’s novels.  (The very last is Pistols for Two, a collection of short stories.)  Originally published in 1957, it is comfortably set within the Regency period that she had made her own.  The setting is London, and the plot involves money, love, misunderstanding, gambling, debt, and, ultimately, a famous heirloom, the Cardross necklace. Continue reading “April Lady, by Georgette Heyer – A Review”

Sprig Muslin, by Georgette Heyer – A Review

From the desk of Laura A. Wallace: 

Georgette Heyer’s Sprig Muslin is one of her most entertaining Regency novels.  It is a “road book,” full of adventures, comical situations, and fun characters.

At the outset, I must beg anyone who leaves a comment to avoid spoilers.  New readers should have the pleasure of discovering Amanda’s antics, their consequences, and who feels what for whom, on their own. Continue reading “Sprig Muslin, by Georgette Heyer – A Review”

A Civil Contract, by Georgette Heyer – A Review

From the desk of Laura A. Wallace: 

A Civil Contract is an atypical Georgette Heyer novel.  While the setting is firmly Regency, beginning at the time of the Battle of Orthez (February 1814) and ending with that of Waterloo (June 1815), it is neither lively nor witty.  It is a quiet book, with a love story that grows gradually, without any sparkle or adventure.  The eponymous contract is a marriage contract between an impoverished, newly-acceded Continue reading “A Civil Contract, by Georgette Heyer – A Review”

Georgette Heyer: Biography of a Bestseller, by Jennifer Kloester – A Review

From the desk of Laura A. Wallace: 

I must acknowledge that it is well-nigh impossible for me to be objective when it comes to reviewing Jennifer Kloester’s new biography of Georgette Heyer which was released this month in the UK.  Rarely have I looked forward so much to reading a biography.  But be assured, gentle reader, that had I found it sub-standard, I would tell you so.  Instead, I am delighted to report that it met or exceeded almost all of Continue reading “Georgette Heyer: Biography of a Bestseller, by Jennifer Kloester – A Review”

The Toll-Gate, by Georgette Heyer – A Review

From the desk of Laura A. Wallace: 

Georgette Heyer’s novel The Toll Gate is a little different from her typical Regencies.  It is more of a mystery than a romance and is told primarily from the point of view of the hero.

The hero, Captain John Staple, shares several characteristics with Hugo Darracott of The Unknown Ajax.  Like Hugo, John is a former army officer who sold out after Napoleon’s defeat—though, in John’s case, he Continue reading “The Toll-Gate, by Georgette Heyer – A Review”

The Unknown Ajax, by Georgette Heyer – A Review

From the desk of Laura A. Wallace: 

The Unknown Ajax is one of Georgette Heyer’s funniest Regencies.  It is populated with some of her more memorable characters and ends with a protracted scene reminiscent of comic opera, with a dozen people coming in and fading out in a seamless composition that builds to a climax as funny as a Heyer fan could wish for.  It might even be funnier than the ending scene in The Grand Sophy. Continue reading “The Unknown Ajax, by Georgette Heyer – A Review”

The Private World of Georgette Heyer, by Jane Aiken-Hodge – A Review

From the desk of Laura A. Wallace: 

Jane Aiken Hodge’s 1984 biography of Georgette Heyer, reissued this month by Sourcebooks, was until very recently the only one available.  Published ten years after Heyer’s death, it describes her life primarily from her letters to her publisher.  An intensely private person, Heyer eschewed publicity, never giving an interview, and not keeping her papers for posterity.  Thus a biographer has relatively little material Continue reading “The Private World of Georgette Heyer, by Jane Aiken-Hodge – A Review”

Bath Tangle, by Georgette Heyer – A Review

From the desk of Laura A. Wallace: 

One of the things about Georgette Heyer is that the question “which of her books is your favorite?” tends to invoke a response corresponding to:  “whichever one I am reading now.”  Every time I reread one of her novels, I am always amazed at how fresh it is, even though I already know the plot; how exquisite the writing; how beautifully delineated the characters; and, perhaps most of all, the breadth and depth of Continue reading “Bath Tangle, by Georgette Heyer – A Review”

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