An Ivy Hill Christmas: A Tales from Ivy Hill Novella, by Julie Klassen—A Review

Ivy Hill Christmas by Julie Klassen 2020From the desk of Sophia Rose:

We return once again to a snug English village tucked away along a coaching road and this time the holiday season brings more than Christmas cheer. The Tales of Ivy Hill are an interrelated series of inspirational historical romances by bestselling author Julie Klassen that bring a whole village to life. The books are tender, gently paced stories that are set against a Regency period historical backdrop that has been well-researched even if the village of Ivy Hill and its characters are fictitious.

In An Ivy Hill Christmas, the fourth installment to the series, the Brockwell prodigal son, Richard, who has seemingly been living the swinging bachelor life in London at the family townhouse while surreptitiously writing satire for his friend’s magazine and working on getting his novels published, is given an ultimatum by his mother. Come home for the holidays or lose her generous allowance.

Richard has been avoiding his family and the family home for years. It pains him because he feels he doesn’t fit into the family and he knows the hurtful lie his father perpetrated and the family still revers the man. Then there is the fact that his mother blatantly schemes to get him married off when he has firm intentions to remain a bachelor. He is certain that she has a prospective lady in mind already. If he must go and suffer Christmas with his family, then he will not go alone. He invites his friend to accompany him along with a stray dog he took up and already has plans to get back to his London life as soon as he can.

Arabella Awdry knew Richard Brockwell was contemptible when they were younger, but his insulting words and attitude when he arrives prove to her that people do not change.  She is prepared to avoid him at all costs no matter how hard her mother and his work to push them together. She is no longer that silly, giggling girl who crushes on handsome Richard and she has dreams of joining her aunt in London to do much-needed charitable work. Continue reading

The House at the End of the Moor, by Michelle Griep—A Review

he House at the End of the Moor by Michelle Griep 2020From the desk of Katie Patchell: 

In Michelle Griep’s latest novel, readers are transported to 19th-century Devon, England to follow a hero and heroine accused of crimes they never committed. In pursuit of justice, the story flows from the gray depths of Dartmoor Prison and its forgotten inmates, to the heights of high society’s glittering concert halls. One word resounds, its echo landing on each page and in both heroes’ hearts: Justice.

Haunted by accusations of her past, Margaret lives out her self-imposed banishment at Morden Hall, surrounded by the shifting skies above an endless moor. Her only companions are her mute maid, grizzled manservant, and loyal dog. Far from the glamour and fame of her past, she is happy with her companions, books, and audience of none as she sings on the open moor.

Everything changes when a man who was there on the day she fell from society’s grace appears unconscious and bleeding outside her home. Margaret is torn: Should she help the man escape the brutish prison guard chasing him, risking her anonymity in the process? Or should she stay hidden, abandoning the “stranger” to his own fate? 

“Death prowled the cellblock like a dark animal seeking prey–especially the weakest. But Oliver Ward would be hanged if he’d let the beast devour the man in the cell besides him. It wasn’t fair. It wasn’t right.” (Line 1, Chapter 1)

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