Women Who Read Are Dangerous, by Stefan Bollmann — A Review

From the desk of Tracy Hickman: 

If you page through Women Who Read Are Dangerous looking for visual representations that most people associate with danger, you might be confused initially. None of the women are brandishing weapons or committing violent acts. Instead, they sit quietly perusing books, pamphlets, magazines, hymnals, and letters. Some subjects have been caught during a momentary pause in their reading, gazing back at the Continue reading “Women Who Read Are Dangerous, by Stefan Bollmann — A Review”

Bloomsbury Girls: A Novel, by Natalie Jenner — A Review

From the desk of Tracy Hickman: 

Natalie Jenner’s debut novel The Jane Austen Society was an international bestseller and one of my favorite books of 2020. Would Ms. Jenner’s latest novel, set in post-war literary London, hold up under the weight of public expectation and comparison with her accomplished first effort? Would the Bloomsbury Girls be up to the task set before them? Continue reading “Bloomsbury Girls: A Novel, by Natalie Jenner — A Review”

The Murder of Mr. Wickham, by Claudia Gray — A Review

From the desk of Sophia Rose:

‘Murder’ and ‘Wickham’ in the same title makes any Jane Austen lover worth their salt sit up and take notice. Now, add that with an author name long associated with young adult sci-fi and fantasy, and that makes Claudia Gray’s The Murder of Mr. Wickham well-nigh irresistible.

The Murder of Mr. Wickham is both a historical mystery and pays homage as a sequel to not one, but all Continue reading “The Murder of Mr. Wickham, by Claudia Gray — A Review”

A Perilous Perspective: A Lady Darby Mystery (Book 10), by Anna Lee Huber — A Review

From the desk of Sophia Rose:

From the first, Anna Lee Huber’s Lady Darby mysteries brought the early Victorian era to life with the atmosphere and gritty backdrop and cunning plot. Add in complex characters led by Lady Darby with a dark past and the layered relationships around her and the series soon became a must-read. A Perilous Perspective is no exception, and I was eager to see Kiera and Gage detecting once again while also Continue reading “A Perilous Perspective: A Lady Darby Mystery (Book 10), by Anna Lee Huber — A Review”

The Matchmaker’s Request: A Regency Romance (Larkhall Letters Book 4), by Ashtyn Newbold — A Review  

From the desk of Katie Patchell:  

Matchmaker: For me, this word conjures up frightening images of domineering great-aunts and nosy neighbors, all wagging their fingers in my unwed face to the beat of Fiddler on the Roof’s justly titled song, “Matchmaker Matchmaker.” While these dreams may have more to do with my unresolved issues (or a rich diet of too sharp cheese), I do have to say in my defense that the word “matchmaker” would be Continue reading “The Matchmaker’s Request: A Regency Romance (Larkhall Letters Book 4), by Ashtyn Newbold — A Review  “

Near the Ruins of Penharrow: A Cornish Romance (Book 3), by Deborah M. Hathaway — A Review

From the desk of Katie Jackson:

On the Cornish coast of England in 1815, the copper mines were often the lifeblood of the community, providing wages for the workers and wealth for the owners. The disparity between the two groups is explored in Near the Ruins of Penharrow, the third book of Deborah M. Hathaway’s riveting Cornish Romance series. Continue reading “Near the Ruins of Penharrow: A Cornish Romance (Book 3), by Deborah M. Hathaway — A Review”

The Time Traveler’s Guide to Regency Britain: A Handbook for Visitors to 1789–1830, by Ian Mortimer — A Review

From the desk of Tracy Hickman: 

Austenesque fiction like The Jane Austen Project and the BBC TV series Lost in Austen have entertained Janeites with fantastic stories about journeying back in time to Austen’s Regency Britain. While I cannot imagine being tempted myself, unless guaranteed a round-trip ticket, the idea of a virtual visit to Austen’s Britain with an experienced tour guide who is a Fellow of the Royal Historical Society, and a writer of Continue reading “The Time Traveler’s Guide to Regency Britain: A Handbook for Visitors to 1789–1830, by Ian Mortimer — A Review”

Lily of the Valley: The Gents (Book 2), by Sarah M. Eden — A Review

From the desk of Katie Jackson:

Historical romance readers, rejoice! Sarah M. Eden has graciously reunited us with those best friends who are like brothers in Book 2 of her Georgian-era The Gents series, Lily of the Valley.

Grumpy Uncle

The Gents were something of a miracle in his life. They’d saved him from a lifetime of loneliness and seen him through times of sorrow. They were like brothers to him. And yet, he often wished them to Hades.” (Loc 204)

Continue reading “Lily of the Valley: The Gents (Book 2), by Sarah M. Eden — A Review”

When Blood Lies: A Sebastian St. Cyr Mystery (Book 17), by C.S. Harris — A Review

From the desk of Sophia Rose:

One of the most vibrant, yet gritty historical mystery series on the market today, the Sebastian St. Cyr series by C.S. Harris captivates and meets readers intellectually and emotionally with remarkable tales that are much more than a clever mystery set in the Regency period. When Blood Lies, the 17th book in the series, is one of my most anticipated reads this year and makes my top favorites lists. Continue reading “When Blood Lies: A Sebastian St. Cyr Mystery (Book 17), by C.S. Harris — A Review”

An Impossible Impostor: A Veronica Speedwell Mystery (Book 7), by Deanna Raybourn — A Review

From the desk of Sophia Rose:

A winning combo occurred when talented authoress, Deanna Raybourn, paired Veronica, and Stoker, two of the most eccentric individuals of the Victorian Age. Sparks fly with their scintillating dialogue and spirits draw in their readers and make it an irksome delight to have to wait for each new release. The Impossible Impostor is their next story in the Veronica Speedwell series and I eagerly consumed it. Continue reading “An Impossible Impostor: A Veronica Speedwell Mystery (Book 7), by Deanna Raybourn — A Review”

Isabel: A Regency Romance (Families of Dorset Book 2), by Martha Keyes — A Review    

From the desk of Katie Patchell:

First love or second love? Sometimes we (and our heroes and heroines) end up with our first loves–these are often the “salad days” stories of childhood and college sweethearts. But sometimes the field is won not by the person we or our heroes/heroines love first, but the person loved last. In Isabel, Martha Keyes’ second novel in her ‘Families of Dorset’ series, readers encounter a thoughtful, romantic take on the Continue reading “Isabel: A Regency Romance (Families of Dorset Book 2), by Martha Keyes — A Review    “

The Viscount Who Loved Me: Bridgerton (Book 2), by Julia Quinn — A Review

From the desk of Rachel McMillan:

Returning to The Viscount Who Loved Me I found myself in the pages of a romantic masterpiece. Here, the canvas of a London season showcases two hearts burdened by grief and anxiety only to find love amidst a cast of familiar characters beloved by readers the world over. Lord Anthony Bridgerton, eldest of the series’ eponymous family is, as ton gossip monger Lady Whistledown insists, a capital R rake. Continue reading “The Viscount Who Loved Me: Bridgerton (Book 2), by Julia Quinn — A Review”

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