The Truth About Mr. Darcy Blog Tour with Author Susan Adriani & a Giveaway!

The Truth About Mr. Darcy, by Susan Adriani (2011)Please join us today in welcoming Austenesque author Susan Adriani for the official launch of her blog tour of The Truth About Mr. Darcy, a new Pride and Prejudice variation that was released on May 1, 2011 by Sourcebooks.

If someone had told me I would end up writing a novel someday (never mind that it would actually be published) I would have laughed at them. As a matter of fact, I’m laughing right now. I can’t help it—the entire experience has been completely surreal.

I never set out to be an author. I was a freelance illustrator turned stir-crazy stay-at-home mom; and I’d discovered early on it was nearly impossible to lay down a watercolor wash and work on a commission when there was a very determined little person clinging to my arm, trying to “help” me all the time. As much as I appreciated my daughter’s assistance (she meant well and was ridiculously cute), it soon became apparent that I needed to find an alternative outlet for my creativity, or completely sacrifice my sanity.

The quick fix was to submerse myself in Jane Austen’s world. During that time, I read Pride and Prejudice repeatedly, all the while wondering what happened to Mr. Darcy and Elizabeth Bennet after the story ended. To my very great pleasure, I found Helen Halstead and Pamela Aiden in my local Borders, and later, Abigail Reynolds online. I quickly fell in love with Abigail’s writing, but even more than that, I was awed by her ability to ask “what if…” and captivated by her talented storytelling. It didn’t take long for my head to become flooded with ideas and possibilities of my own.

The end result was my first book, The Truth About Mr. Darcy (formerly titled Affinity and Affection). Based on the premise of Mr. Darcy actually getting off his high horse (both figuratively and literally) to warn Elizabeth Bennet about George Wickham’s dissolute character. It is the story of a very different journey for our couple. With Darcy’s honesty, Elizabeth is able to see him with a new perspective, and Darcy, because he recognizes Elizabeth’s value earlier in their acquaintance, is far more willing to swallow his pride and attempt to win her good opinion. And of course, there is passion!

I’ve included an excerpt from the first chapter, and hope you’ll enjoy reading it as much as I’ve enjoyed being here today.

That evening, in the privacy of their room, Elizabeth disclosed to Jane the particulars of her conversation with Darcy. Never wanting to think ill of anyone, Jane insisted Wickham could not possibly be so very bad as Darcy’s account of him made him seem. “But, Lizzy, are you certain, absolutely certain, he has such designs at this time? Perhaps he has come to regret his past actions and is anxious to reestablish his character in the eyes of the world. He seems to possess such an expression of goodness in his addresses.”

Elizabeth shook her head. “No, Jane. I would well wish to think as you do, but I cannot help but believe it unlikely. Though Mr. Darcy’s countenance bespoke the most vehement dislike of Mr. Wickham, you did not notice the way Mr. Wickham looked at Mr. Darcy. His expression was one of such derision and insolence. No, I cannot so easily acquit him of the crimes Mr. Darcy has laid at his door. I feel most inclined to believe he is not a man to be trusted.”

“By this account, then, Lizzy, he appears to feel as passionately for Mr. Darcy as Mr. Darcy does for him. Something very bad, perhaps even worse than what Mr. Darcy has related to you with regard to their association, must surely have occurred to promote such strong feelings of aversion.”

“I confess I am of your opinion on this matter. Mr. Darcy was most disturbed, Jane. Even as he was speaking privately to me of Mr. Wickham, he remained visibly so. It is most out of character for him to reveal such emotions on any matter, and given this, I cannot help but wonder whether he may yet be keeping something further to himself.”

Jane was thoughtful for a long moment before saying quietly, “Lizzy, I do believe Mr. Darcy must be in love with you.”

Elizabeth stared at her and laughed. “Jane! Whatever makes you think such a thing? Surely Mr. Darcy feels nothing for me. You remember his comment at the assembly, do you not?”

“Indeed, it was very wrong of him to say such a thing at all, never mind in company, but, Lizzy, does it not strike you as incredible that a man of Mr. Darcy’s notoriety—such a proud, private man of much significance in the world—would speak with you so willingly and openly about his dealings with such a man as Mr. Wickham? I can hardly credit it. No, it could only be a compliment to you, my dearest sister.”

“Really, Jane, this is too absurd!” She laughed again. “You know just as well as I do, Mr. Darcy holds me in contempt for my decided opinions and my impertinent manner. He would never deign to pay his addresses to me, an unknown country miss with nothing more than fifty pounds and my charms to recommend me, not when he could have a fashionable woman with fifty thousand and a title.”

Jane smiled. “I beg to differ.”

Elizabeth made to protest, but Jane silenced her. “You forget, Lizzy, I, as well as Charlotte, have noticed the attention Mr. Darcy pays you, even if it is nothing more than staring at you from across the room. It cannot have escaped your keen observation that you are, indeed, the only lady he stares at.” Jane shook her head. “No, there is no other explanation for it. Mr. Darcy must be in love with you.” The discussion was continued in earnest, and half the night was spent in conversation.

Thank you, Laurel Ann, for having me on Austenprose today as your guest blogger. It was a pleasure for me to be here, and wonderful fun!

Author Susan Adriani (2011)Author Bio:

Susan Adriani has been a fan of Jane Austen and her beloved characters for as long as she can remember. Originally from New England, she attended a small art college close to her home, where she majored in illustration. In 2007, after contemplating the unexplored possibilities in one of Miss Austen’s most celebrated novels, Pride and Prejudice, she began to write her first novel-length story, The Truth About Mr. Darcy (formerly Affinity and Affection). With encouragement from fellow Austen enthusiasts she continued, and is currently at work on her second and third books. She lives in Southern New England with her husband, young daughter, and a very impertinent cat. Website: Austen Inspired Fiction by Susan Adriani, Blog: Austen Authors, Facebook: Susan Adriani, Twitter: @DarcyBabe1.

Giveaway of The Truth About Mr. Darcy

Enter a chance to win one of three copies of The Truth About Mr. Darcy, by leaving a comment answering what intrigues you most about reading a Pride and Prejudice variation, or which of Austen’s novels you would like to see Susan write about next, by midnight PT, Wednesday, May 11, 2011. Winner announced on Thursday, May 12, 2010. Shipment to US and Canadian addresses only. Good luck!

The Truth About Mr. Darcy, by Susan Adriani
Sourcebooks (2011)
Trade paperback (512) pages
ISBN: 978-1402246135

2007 – 2011 Susan Adriani, Austenprose

55 thoughts on “The Truth About Mr. Darcy Blog Tour with Author Susan Adriani & a Giveaway!

  1. I love Pride and Prejudice variations because it is so interesting to see how Elizabeth and Darcy might have reacted in different situations. What would they say if someone did this? What would they do if someone did that? Plus, I just love to hang out with old friends. :) The Truth About Mr. Darcy looks like it will certainly be a good one.
    I would love to read a variation on Persuasion. It is tied with Pride and Prejudice for my affections, and the story and characters have wonderful possibilities.

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  2. Ms. Jane had a quality of writing books that begged to be answered “What happened next??” Or “What if….?”

    Thanks to writers such as yourself…we have that option! =)

    Cyn

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  3. Congrats to Susan & thank you for the giveaway!!!!

    what amazes me about authors like you, is having the vision to ‘run’ with JaneAusten’s ideas…….especially in bringing in new characters to an existing setting………..yet, still keeping in the style of JaneAusten………..

    thank you again……..

    Cynthia
    cyn209@juno.com

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  4. Please write about Emma. I have recently watched, for the first – 30th time, the 2009 Masterpiece version of Emma. While I gather this was the least watched of any of the Austen stories that year, I can’t understand why. To me it is the best of that year and the Best Emma ever. Besides which Jonny Lee Miller’s Mr. Knightley, is almost as iconic as Colin Firth’s Mr. Darcy. What if Mrs. Churchill hadn’t died? or what if Mr. Woodhouse died before Emma and Knightley “found” each other.

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  5. Reading variations of P&P is like an addiction, I just can’t stop. It’s interesting and a lot of fun to see my favorite characters is new situations.

    I’d like to read more variations of Persuasion.

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  6. I love reading Pride and Prejudice variations and this version sounds thoroughly exciting. I read the excerpt and want nothing more but to continue reading. Thank you for the giveaway. I’ll be adding this to my reading list.

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  7. I think I love the variations because I’ve been doing something like that with my favorite books/movies/television shows since I was a kid. I really love the “what if” question, which is why I love to write myself.

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  8. I just love seeing how the twists can turn out. Sometimes the modern inserts that creep in bug me for a second, but sometimes not even for that long! Anything with Elizabeth Bennet in it HAS to be good.

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  9. It is always interesting to wonder how the ending would change if the characters had behaved differently.
    Would love to read a prequel/variation of Persuasion about Anne and Wentworth’s first relationship, and if Anne had accepted him then against her family and friend’s advice

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  10. What intrigues me is the variation of P and P. I never liked the books that were so different than the original (like if Mr. Darcy has an affair with Lydia), but the variations within the characters’ personalities (so to speak) are so interesting!

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  11. Thank you for the peek at The Truth About Mr. Darcy, it sounds delightful. I would love to see Susan’s take on Sense and Sensibility with such opposite sisters and the drama surrounding them.

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  12. I like to read the variations and see how others may have written the story and what may have happened after P&P ends. I seem to be addicted to the variations. I have a special section in my library for them. :)

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  13. Hi Lieder – it’s so nice to see you! I agree with you about hanging out with old friends, because all of Jane Austen’s characters feel that way to me.

    Cynthia, that’s so nice of you – thank you so much! My best friend since grade school mentioned to me that she couldn’t imagine writing dialog between any characters, which amazes me – she’s very talented in her own right. For me, though, it isn’t so difficult as it is fun…if the characters are cooperating!

    Felicia, there is a wonderful modern variation out there by Mary Lydon Simonsen called “Anne Elliot, A New Beginning: A Persuasion Re-imagining”. Mary has a wonderful sense of humor, and I’m a big fan of her writing.

    Fatima, I’m so glad you enjoyed the excerpt – thank you! I would like to point out that The Truth About Mr. Darcy was previously published under the title Affinity and Affection. Sourcebooks insisted on changing the title when they acquired the rights to it, and it’s been causing some confusion.

    Margay, I think we have something in common! As a child, I would spend hours day dreaming about the characters of my favorite books and movies. I’m glad to hear that you write, too!

    Stephanie, when I first discovered an entire world devoted to Jane Austen’s characters (especially Pride and Prejudice) I had a very difficult time embracing the modern take-offs, but like you I got over it pretty quickly – I love Elizabeth Bennet and Mr. Darcy too much not to be curious! There are some wonderful imaginings out there, and I would have missed out on some truly excellent stories.

    Nida, have you read anything by Susan Kaye? She’s a lovely author who has written some beautiful stories based on Jane Austen’s Persuasion. I don’t think you’d be disappointed at all!

    Joy Andrea, I can’t seem to bring myself to read anything that doesn’t result in Mr. Darcy having his happily ever after with Elizabeth either – I’m far too emotionally invested in these characters. I shudder to think of him wanting to have an affair with Lydia, lol!

    Thank you so much, Merry – and you’re very welcome. I love giving people a sneak peek at the book. I have actually entertained the idea of writing a Sense and Sensibility “What If”, but at the moment I’m afraid I have my hands full with Mr. Darcy (he can be very demanding, you know!)

    Sherry, I’m addicted to variations, too. There are so many fantastic books out there now to satisfy our cravings, and also a number of wonderful sites devoted to Jane Austen fanfiction. You could actually log on and get lost in them for weeks!

    Thank you so much, ladies, for taking the time to read and leave a comment – wishing you all wonderful luck on the drawing!

    Best,
    Susan

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  14. Our divine Miss Austen, more than any other author, throws me into wonderful reveries of what I call “projections, or extending the story beyond the intended end. Pride and Prejudice has a great number of characters that I have “projected.” One of the saddest characters is Miss Anne De Bourgh. I felt so sorry for her being under the thumb of her overbearing mother and often thought she deserved a sequel which allowed her to somehow escape and thrive in a different environment. Another is Col Fitzwilliam who is very much the gentleman but has no one to call his own. Throw in the two younger Bennet girls and you have a fist-ful of interesting sequels.

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  15. Congratulations! It is challenging enough to write a book when you are retired (as I am), but to have a little one helping, we’ll that it is an accomplishment. I too am intrigued by Colonel Fitzwilliam, and I would like to know more about how Mr. Knighley came to love Emma. Get after it, Susan. :)

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  16. I have a couple of P & P variations, but haven’t yet read them. Since there are lots of ‘sequels’ for P & P available, I’d like to see a take-off on Persuasion. Thanks for the giveaway.

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  17. What intrigues me most is getting to read about my favorite characters getting their HEA from another author’s angle.
    I can’t wait to read this book! It has been on my TBR list the moment I first read about it months ago!

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  18. Jeffrey, if you’re looking for an Anne de Bourgh who spreads her wings, let me direct you to Mary Lydon Simonsen. You can find Anne de Bourgh in many of her lovely stories (albeit as a secondary character) and Mary does a wonderful and entertaining job of coaxing her to break out from under the shadow of her imposing mother.

    Hi Mary, and thank you! I’m so happy you’re here! :) It is definitely a challenge to write with so many interruptions – ah, I mean an eager little helper, lol – and I am in awe of those who manage it with full-time jobs outside of the house (Sharon Lathan comes immediately to mind, or as I like to call her – Superwoman!) Alas, I am not the gal to do anything regarding Emma Woodhouse. She’s far from crowning my list of favorite Jane Austen characters (although I am very fond of Mr. Knightly), but you might be on to something – I bet writing a story like that would pose a very good challenge.

    Linda, thank you for stopping by! As I may have mentioned earlier, Susan Kaye does a lovely job with Persuasion, but from Captain Wentworth’s perspective. I don’t think you’d be disappointed at all!

    Thank you so much, Jeffrey, Mary, and Linda – I’m so glad you stopped by to say hello!

    Best,
    Susan

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  19. I love reading the “continuing” stories based on our favorite couple from P & P. Perhaps you’re working on Emma? Does Emma really give up on match making??? Thanks for the chance to win.

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  20. I love variation novels because I like to see how other people think the characters lives turn out. I can’t wait to read this!

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  21. I love Jane Austen’s variations for they take us to a different perspective and a chance to be with our favorite characters some more in a new way.

    I would love for Susan to write a book based on Mansfield Park.

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  22. The draw that these books have on me is a love of the characters and just that wish, that secret hope, of finding something new by Jane Austen. And though it’s not likely to happen, these novels let me live out that fantasy in a small way.

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  23. I think when something…book, short story, TV show, movie…is well written, the characters come “alive” to us and it is natural to want to know more, to spend more time with them. Since Jane Austen can’t provide us with more, we look elsewhere. Some times it works, some times it doesn’t, but the chance is worth the reading. ;-)

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  24. Congratulations, Susan!
    I thoroughly enjoyed reading this story. I love a Darcy on the chase of all things good. You have a wonderful talent to be sure. I loved everything about this book, including that beautiful cover. There is nothing better than seeing the people you care about succeed in what they are doing. Now get on with more writing ;)

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  25. This story sounds wonderful! I love reading Pride and Prejudice variations to see a different direction the story can take. I would love to read a book by Susan based on Emma. Emma is one of my favorite Austen novels! I can’t wait to read this new book!!

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  26. I would love to see her write a book about Northanger Abbey. There are not many “sequels” to that, and I think Susan would do an amazing job!

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  27. Congratulations on your success, Susan! It’s an encouragement to those of us who haven’t quite made it yet. I enjoyed the excerpt and your writing style, and I would love to read the book. Sounds, from the premise, as if it would answer some of my own “what if” questions about my favorite book.

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  28. Lynn, thank you! Oh, no – Emma is a tough one for me! Juliet Archer wrote a modern take on it, though, “The Importance of Being Emma,” and it sounds lovely. (Don’t you just adore the title?)

    Vickie, I love variations for the same reasons. They’re wonderful fun and really feed the imagination!

    Patricia, how did you know I’ve always had a fascination with Henry Crawford?! (Shh, but maybe I shouldn’t tell anyone, lol! He could be a very interesting study!)

    Lynnae, I felt exactly the same way before I started writing, and still feel that way every time I come across a new sequel or variation, open it up, and get lost in it. It’s like spending time with old friends.

    Missy, I couldn’t agree more. I’ve taken a chance on some wonderful stories, and never regretted it!

    Hi, Trez! Aw, you are absolutely fabulous, as always! Thank you so much for saying such lovely things about my writing – I can’t wipe the smile off my face. You made my day, so, for you, I’ll get right back to work. :)

    Kelli, thank you so much – I’m thrilled that you’re excited about my book! I hope you enjoy it as much as I enjoyed writing it.

    Katie, thank you so much for the vote of confidence! You’re really wonderful!

    Hi, Carey! It’s so nice to see you! I hope it will fly off the shelves, too, but so far haven’t seen even one copy in my area bookstore and it’s very disappointing. I may have to take a trip to a more populated area. :)

    Shannon, thank you so much! I’m so happy you enjoyed the excerpt. How wonderful that you write, too! It’s a very challenging path to forge, but once you’re on it, it’s pretty hard to turn back – so keep going, and good luck to you!

    Thank you to everyone who was kind enough to leave a comment – I really love hearing your thoughts and suggestions. And best of luck on the drawing!

    Best,
    Susan

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  29. I will be ordering this if I don’t win it. It’s already in my amazon shopping cart. I love Elizabeth and Darcy’s story, especially that his love for her causes him to embrace humility and make adjustments in his thinking as well as behavior. Jane Austen created such terrific characters when she wrote them and I just can’t get enough of them. Thanks for writing another variation. I will really look forward to reading it!

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  30. I loved the interview & the excerpt – thank you for giving us a glimpse into this story! HF is my favorite genre, and what I love most about P&P variations is that there are so many different directions the author can take as far as the characters are concerned. So many twists and story lines to be had ;) As for future variations, I’d love to see works done on Northanger Abbey or Persuasion… LOTS of possibilities with those stories!

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    • ***Sorry for responding to my own message… I forgot to click on the “Notify me…” for the follow-ups ;)

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  31. Hi Susan!

    Congratulations on your first publication! I am very excited to read your book! I have never read any of Jane Austin’s works, or renditions of them; and after reading part of your first chapter above, I am very intrigued! Goodluck with everything, and much success to you!!

    Stephanie

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  32. Valerie, I love sharing my book, so it was my pleasure! Persuasion has always been a favorite of mine, and you’re right – there are so many wonderful possibilities for variations within; Northanger Abbey, too. Thanks so much for letting me know you enjoyed my excerpt, and good luck on the drawing!

    Best,
    Susan

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  33. Congratulations, Susan! I wish you all the best on your book! What I like best about variations is seeing other directions a story can go. I am always amazed by the creativity in writers! There is always a spot in a book where I think, I what if she did this or he should have done that. I love reading these variations! Especially P&P, but would love more on Persuasion and maybe Northanger Abbey.

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  34. First, I would like to say congratulations to Susan Adriani on her new book release. That is a wonderful accomplishment. The excerpt sounds wonderful and I look forward to reading the book! I think the thing I like most about the P&P variations is that they keep the the same tone as the originals. I love that era in history and I love that people’s daily lives were so different than ours today. It was a much simpler time, but I think it was also a time when beauty was truly appreciated. They were able to find beauty in things that we take for granted today. Also, they were more focused on living a virtuous life and today we are all in such a hurry, that we don’t take much time to consider wether we are doing the right thing or not. I really just love all things associated with that era. So, I would probably love what ever your next idea becomes.

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  35. I love variations. I love to see an author’s interpretation of the characters and the story and see where they take it next. Each variation is unique and it’s great to see different versions of the same story with the same beloved characters.

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  36. I love reading variations on Jane Austen’s work, but I love the most those variations that explore the characters from Austen’s “Pride & Prejudice”. Of course this happens to be due to my bias, because Pride & Prejudice is undoubtedly one of my most favorite novels, ever. That being said, I think that there is just such a smorgasbord of interesting characters to explore in that novel that this makes it easier for a contemporary author to pick a character, or idea from the book and run with it, so to speak – although to me, all of Jane Austen’s work is more like a leisurely stroll in the most vivid and fragrant garden one could imagine.

    Plus, it is always wonderful to see another person’s perspective on the same character. It is as if looking at the very same character you love in another light, in another situation, from another angle. Plus, all the various possibilities about how life progresses for these characters, or how things could have been different. As much as I’d love for an author to do a variation on “Persuasion”, I would also like for some authors to explore Austen’s earlier work — like Lady Susan which might have been written as early as 1794.

    Thank you for the giveaway, and for introducing us to this book. It’s going on my TBR list! :D

    ~Hira~

    Email: Enamoredsoul(at)gmail(dot)com
    Twitter: @inluvwithbookz

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  37. Can’t wait to read the book! I can so relate. Due to a career change I am now a stay at home mom and have found so many wonderful Jane Austen related authors and blogs. I love the variations because I often have so many questions and the “what if” variations that take the road less taken are my favorite!

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  38. Stephanie, oh my gosh! How wonderful that you’re here – thank you so much for actually stopping by and saying hello! :) I really hope you’ll enjoy my book – but it might make you blush, lol! :)

    Candy, thank you! I feel the same way you do. There are so many little things that pop up while I read, and I just can’t help asking “what if”. P&P provides a wonderful opportunity for exactly that, as do Jane Austen’s other beloved texts.

    Hi Charla, and thank you so much! I’m a huge fan of the Regency era myself. I love the politeness of the time, the customs, and countless other details and social situations we no longer seem to practice day to day. You mentioned virtuousness, too, so I’d like to take this opportunity to mention to readers that my book contains some very explicit moments between Mr. Darcy and Elizabeth Bennet. I would hate to have someone pick it up expecting one thing, only to realize too late that it was very different from what they thought it to be initially. That aside, I do hope you and others will read it and find it enjoyable, Charla!

    Nicole, I agree! It’s thrilling to pick up a book and see how many different authors decide to handle certain scenarios, with many different results. It’s always a wonderful adventure.

    Hira, I love variations for the same reasons – so many possibilities and endings for so many wonderful characters, and, as Pride and Prejudice is also my favorite, I’m afraid I can’t stop myself from concentrating most of my energy and imagination on it, more than any other. One possibility I love reading about is Sanditon, which Jane Austen never finished. There are several conclusions out there that were completed by different authors, and I’ve enjoyed discovering each variation very much.

    Jennifer, it’s so nice to find a kindred spirit! I spent many, many hours (okay, months, lol!) submersed in the world of Jane Austen fanfiction, where I first posted and self-published The Truth About Mr. Darcy as Affinity and Affection. I really hope you’ll enjoy reading it!

    Thank you so much, everyone, for leaving such lovely and thoughtful comments. Good luck to you!

    Best,
    Susan

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  39. I love to dive over and over again into the world of Austen. What if’s give me the outlet to immerse myself in the characters I love.

    Thank you Susan and Congratulations!

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  40. Thanks Susan and Laurel Ann for the giveaway. I like that this book starts from a simple and straightforward idea for a variation which will give a whole new perspective on E & D’s relationship, I’m sure. Although I have read Susan Kaye’s two books, I would love a variation on Persuasion. Other comments have also started me thinking about Northanger Abbey, another favorite of mine. But I’m sure that story, because it’s a parody, would represent a greater challenge for the author of a variation, greater than the other stories.

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  41. Thank you, Becky! I absolutely love to submerse myself in Jane Austen’s world, be it as a reader or writer, it’s just so satisfying (and more than a little addictive!)

    Lena, if you’re looking for a modern day Persuasion, Abigail Reynolds has just released her novel “Morning Light.” Mary Lydon Simonsen also has a modern rendition of Persuasion, too, called “Anne Elliot: A New Beginning.” Both authors are two of my favorites. Thanks so much!

    Good luck in the drawing, Becky and Lena, and thank you for reading!

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  42. I always love a good JA variation. It’s intriguing to see how we all envision the different characters, how we imagine them, how some ideas are similar and some so different. It offers new insights into the characters as we (ok, at least when I) reread JA’s works. I’d mentioned someone doing some more Fanny and Edmund variation or backstory in another post, but I also think that Captain Wentworth and Anne for some more stories to tell, too.

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  43. Bloggin BB, I’ve always been fascinated with the different ways we all view Jane Austen’s characters, be it in one scenario, or a variety of them. It’s amazing how many different outcomes are possible!

    Best,
    Susan

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  44. OK! There are so many things I love about variations. I love seeing how each author portray’s Darcy, what situations the author puts Darcy and Elizabeth in. I know they will end up together, but how are they going to get there? Also, I like to see how quickly they learn to trust each other and when Lizzy begins seeing Darcy as a different person. Oh, I could go on and on. Variations, I believe, are my favorite; I can never seem to put them down until I am finished reading. (Not sure if that is a good thing or a bad thing) ;) Can’t wait to read the book!! :)

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  45. Jakki, can I just say that I think you have the most wonderful last name! I love reading variations myself, and have found so many excellent ones out there that my poor bookshelf has more than reached capacity. (I guess I really ought to get another bookshelf!) With all of those terrific titles out there, it means a great deal to me to hear that you’re excited about reading my book. Thank you so much!

    Best,
    Susan

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  46. I haven’t read any P & P variation novels yet, but this one sounds most intriguing! Would love to sit down and immerse myself in this book. Thanks for the opportunity!

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  47. Pingback: Giveaway Winners Announced for The Truth About Mr. Darcy « Austenprose – A Jane Austen Blog

  48. Warm congratulations to:

    Lena L. (who left a comment on May 7th)

    Karen Field (who left a comment on May 3rd)

    Chelsea B. (who left a comment on May 2nd)

    It looks like you’ve each won a copy of The Truth About Mr. Darcy! (At least that’s what Laurel Ann’s announcement says!) I sincerely hope you’ll enjoy reading it. (Chelsea! You finally got one – yea!) :)

    Thanks so much to everyone who left me a comment or just stopped in to read my post. I loved being here with all of you. And a heartfelt thank you to you, too, Laurel Ann. Your beautiful site and wonderful readers made my experience on this tour special. It was a pleasure to be here!

    Best,
    Susan

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