Giveaway Winners Announced for Jane Austen Birthday Soirée 2012

Austen Soirée

47 of you left comments qualifying you for a chance to win one copy of Jane Austen Made Me Do It and one copy of The Missing Manuscript of Jane Austen offered during the Jane Austen Birthday Soirée 2012. The winners drawn at random are:

Jane Austen Made Me Do It

  • Sofia Guerra who left a comment on December 16, 2012

The Missing Manuscript of Jane Austen

  • Bookfool, aka Nancy who left a comment on December 18, 2012

Congratulations ladies! To claim your prize, please contact me with your full name and address by December 27, 2012.  Shipment to US addresses only.

Many thanks to Maria of My Jane Austen Book Club for organizing the Jane Austen Birthday Soiree, and to author Syrie James and her publisher Berkley Trade for the giveaway copy of The Missing Manuscript of Jane Austen. Happy reading to the winners!

© 2012 Laurel Ann Nattress, Austenprose

Jane Austen Made Me Do It eBook now $4.99

Jane Austen Made Me Do It, edited by Laurel Ann Nattress (2011)Huzzah! In honor of Jane Austen’s 237th birthday on December 16th, my fabulous publisher Ballantine Books has lowered the eBook price of Jane Austen Made Me Do It by 67% off list price to $4.99 for a limited time only!

YES! Only $4.99!!!

For those of you unfamiliar with my Austen-inspired short story anthology, here is a brief description:

JANE AUSTEN MADE ME DO IT: Original Stories Inspired by Literature’s Most Astute Observer of the Human Heart is a new short story anthology edited by Laurel Ann Nattress and available in trade paperback and eBook from Ballantine Books.

This delightful collection inspired by Jane Austen—her novels, her life, her wit, her world—features an introduction and twenty-two never-before-published stories written by twenty-four authors from a diverse range of interests and writing experience; their uniting link is their admiration and love of the literary great, Jane Austen. Stories included are:

Original short stories in Jane Austen Made Me Do It

  1. “Jane Austen’s Nightmare”, by Syrie James
  2. “Waiting”, by Jane Odiwe
  3. “A Night at Northanger”, by Lauren Willig
  4. “Jane and the Gentleman Rogue”, by Stephanie Barron
  5. “Faux Jane”, by Diane Meier and Frank Delaney
  6. “Nothing Less Than Fairyland”, by Monica Fairview
  7. “Love and Best Wishes”, Adriana Trigiani
  8. “Jane Austen and the Mistletoe Kiss”, by Jo Beverly
  9. “When Only a Darcy Will Do”, by Beth Pattillo
  10. “Heard of You”, by Margaret Sullivan
  11. “The Ghostwriter”, by Elizabeth Aston
  12. “Mr. Bennet Meets His Match”, by Amanda Grange
  13. “Jane Austen, Yeah, Yeah, Yeah”, by Janet Mullany
  14. “Letters to Lydia”, by Maya Slater
  15. “The Mysterious Closet”, by Myretta Robens
  16. “Jane Austen’s Cat”, by Diana Birchall
  17. “Me and Mr. Darcy, Again”, by Alexandra Potter
  18. “What Would Austen Do?”, by Jane Rubino and Caitlen Rubino-Bradway
  19. “The Riding Habit”, by Pamela Aidan
  20. “The Chase”, by Carrie Bebris
  21. “The Love Letter”, by Brenna Aubrey
  22. “Intolerable Stupidity”, by Laurie Viera Rigler

From Regency or contemporary, romantic or fantastical, each of these marvelous stories reaffirms the incomparable influence of one of history’s most cherished authors.

Jane Austen Made Me Do It is the rare short-story compilation in which each and every one of the twenty-two stories manages to shine. Each contains a new take on Austen, a new concept of what Austen hoped to do with her life and work or even a new take on modern romance from Austen’s viewpoint.” — Romance Junkies

“Each story in this anthology is very unique. I had so many favorites among them that it was really hard to pick just two. If you’re a Jane Austen fan, you have to read Jane Austen Made Me Do It!” — Popcorn Reads

“For fans of “Austenesque” fiction, this collection will be a box of bonbons.” — The Seattle Times

Make haste! You can download a free sample of Jane Austen Made Me Do It and purchase this limited time reduced price of the eBook at these major online retailers:

If you don’t have a digital eReader, you can download the free software and read it on your PC, Mac, Blackberry, Ipod, or many other electronic devises. Just visit Barnes & Nobel or Amazon and follow the download instruction for your device.

Did you know that you can purchase eBooks as gifts? Yes. Jane Austen Made Me Do It is the perfect holiday gift for that special Janeite friend or family member. It is as easy as a click and an email address away from quick and easy holiday shopping.

Happy Birthday Jane Austen. Thanks for the making us do it. Enjoy!

Cheers,

Laurel Ann

© 2012 Laurel Ann Nattress, Austenprose

Jane Austen Birthday Soirée 2013: Celebrating A Plan of a Novel

Jane Austen Birthday Soirée (2012)Today, December 16th, is Jane Austen’s birthday. 237 years ago she was born at Steventon Rectory in Hampshire, England.

In celebration of my favorite author, I am participating in the Jane Austen Birthday Soiree being hosted by Maria at My Jane Austen Book Club blog. It is basically a blog hop with many great giveaways being offered. Each blog will feature a favorite passage from one of Austen’s works.

For your enjoyment, I have selected a short piece that exemplifies Austen’s humor, one her many talents that I am particularly fond of. A Plan of a Novel was written in 1816, probably in response to Austen’s visit to Carlton House in London with the Prince Regent’s librarian Rev. James Stanier Clarke and their subsequent correspondence in which he offers advice to the author on the subject of her next novel; and her family’s advice on the same subject! It is a parody, similar to her exuberant and fantastical Juvenilia, and her early novel Northanger Abbey, satirizing what was outrageous in the popular literature of her day. Interestingly, she also including notes in the margins indicating which of her family members made the suggestions!

The manuscript of Plan of a Novel now resides at The Morgan Library & Museum in New York City. You can view an image of the original document of A Plan of a Novel online at their website.

Plan of a Novel, according to hints from various quarters, by Jane Austen

Scene be in the Country, Heroine the Daughter of a Clergyman, one who after having lived much in the World had retired from it and settled in a Curacy, with a very small fortune of his own. — He, the most excellent Man that can be imagined, perfect in Character, Temper, and Manners — without the smallest drawback or peculiarity to prevent his being the most delightful companion to his Daughter from one year’s end to the other. — Heroine a faultless Character herself, — perfectly good, with much tenderness and sentiment, and not the least Wit — very highly accomplished, understanding modern Languages and (generally speaking) everything that the most accomplished young Women learn, but particularly excelling in Music —  her favourite pursuit —  and playing equally well on the PianoForte and Harp — and singing in the first stile. Her Person quite beautiful — dark eyes and plump cheeks. — Book to open with the description of Father and Daughter —  who are to converse in long speeches, elegant Language —  and a tone of high serious sentiment. — The Father to be induced, at his Daughter’s earnest request, to relate to her the past events of his Life. This Narrative will reach through the greatest part of the first volume — as besides all the circumstances of his attachment to her Mother and their Marriage, it will comprehend his going to sea as Chaplain to a distinguished naval character about the Court, his going afterwards to Court himself, which introduced him to a great variety of Characters and involved him in many interesting situations, concluding with his opinions on the Benefits to result from Tithes being done away, and his having buried his own Mother (Heroine’s lamented Grandmother) in consequence of the High Priest of the Parish in which she died refusing to pay her Remains the respect due to them. The Father to be of a very literary turn, an Enthusiast in Literature, nobody’s Enemy but his own — at the same time most zealous in discharge of his Pastoral Duties, the model of an exemplary Parish Priest. — The heroine’s friendship to be sought after by a young woman in the same Neighbourhood, of Talents and Shrewdness, with light eyes and a fair skin, but having a considerable degree of Wit, Heroine shall shrink from the acquaintance.

From this outset, the Story will proceed, and contain a striking variety of adventures. Heroine and her Father never above a fortnight together in one place, he being driven from his Curacy by the vile arts of some totally unprincipled and heart-less young Man, desperately in love with the Heroine, and pursuing her with unrelenting passion. — No sooner settled in one Country of Europe than they are necessitated to quit it and retire to another — always making new acquaintance, and always obliged to leave them. — This will of course exhibit a wide variety of Characters — but there will be no mixture; the scene will be for ever shifting from one Set of People to another — but All the Good will be unexceptionable in every respect — and there will be no foibles or weaknesses but with the Wicked, who will be completely depraved and infamous, hardly a resemblance of humanity left in them. — Early in her career, in the progress of her first removals, Heroine must meet with the Hero — all perfection of course — and only prevented from paying his addresses to her by some excess of refinement. — Wherever she goes, somebody falls in love with her, and she receives repeated offers of Marriage — which she refers wholly to her Father, exceedingly angry that he should not be first applied to. — Often carried away by the anti-hero, but rescued either by her Father or by the Hero — often reduced to support herself and her Father by her Talents and work for her Bread; continually cheated and defrauded of her hire, worn down to a Skeleton, and now and then starved to death. — At last, hunted out of civilized Society, denied the poor Shelter of the humblest Cottage, they are compelled to retreat into Kamschatka where the poor Father, quite worn down, finding his end approaching, throws himself on the Ground, and after 4 or 5 hours of tender advice and parental Admonition to his miserable Child, expires in a fine burst of Literary Enthusiasm, intermingled with Invectives against holders of Tithes. — Heroine inconsolable for some time — but afterwards crawls back towards her former Country — having at least 20 narrow escapes from falling into the hands of the Anti-hero — and at last in the very nick of time, turning a corner to avoid him, runs into the arms of the Hero himself, who having just shaken off the scruples which fetter’d him before, was at the very moment setting off in pursuit of her. — The Tenderest and completest Eclaircissement takes place, and they are happily united. — Throughout the whole work, Heroine to be in the most elegant Society and living in high style. The name of the work not to be Emma, but of the same sort as S. & S. and P. & P.

End

If this bit of joyful burlesque amusement made you smile, you might want to pre-order Syrie James’ new novel The Missing Manuscript of Jane Austen to be released on December 31, 2012. This new novel was inspired by Jane Austen’s Plan of a Novel. You can read my preview here. I have read Ms. James’ new work and it is indeed a clever incorporation of Austen humor, romance and biting wit.

A GRAND GIVEAWAY

Now gentle readers, in celebration of our favorite author please leave a comment sharing your favorite Austen novel, novella, or minor work to qualify for a chance to win one copy each of Jane Austen Made Me Do It and The Missing Manuscript of Jane Austen. The contest is open to US residents and ends on December 18th, 2012 at 11:59 pm Pacific time. Winner to be announced on Thursday, December 20th, 2012. Good luck to all, and Happy Birthday Jane!

Please visit the other participants in The Jane Austen Birthday Soirée 2013 by clicking on the links to their blogs listed below. Have fun!

© 2012 Laurel Ann Nattress, Austenprose

Giveaway Winners Announced for the Jane Austen Made Me Do It Scavenger Hunt

Jane Austen Made Me Do It, edited by Laurel Ann Nattress (2011)56 of you participated in the Jane Austen Made Me Do It Scavenger Hunt during the Austenesque Extravaganza; entering you in a chance to win one of three copies of Austenesque books available in the giveaway. The three winners chosen at random are:

  • Chelsea Knestrick who won a copy of The Darcy Connection, by Elizabeth Ashton
  • Robyn Brown who won a copy of Rude Awakenings of a Jane Austen Addict, by Laurie Viera Rigler
  • Emily Bell who won a copy of The Matters at Mansfield, by Carrie Bebris

Congratulations to all the very lucky winners! To claim your prize, please contact me with your full name and address by October 10, 2012.  Shipment to US addresses only.

Here are the answers to the JAMMDI scavenger hunt. I hope everyone had a wonderful time hunting!

Pamela Aidan is famous for her Fitzwilliam Darcy, Gentleman series, but she also the publisher of a small press of Austenesque authors. What is the name of her publishing house?

Wytherngate Press

Elizabeth Aston is the bestselling author of six novels based on Mr. Darcy and his family. What is the name of the third book in the series? Bonus question: Which Jane Austen character said the line that Elizabeth used in the title?

The True Darcy Spirit. Lady Catherine de Bourgh

Brenna Aubrey’s story “The Love Letter” won the Jane Austen Made Me Do It short story contest. Besides being a budding author, what language is she fluent in besides English?

French

Stephanie Barron channels Jane Austen in her famous Being a Jane Austen Mystery series. She also writes spy mysteries under what other pen name?

Francine Matthews

Carrie Bebris is the awarding winning novelist of the Mr. and Mrs. Darcy Mysteries series. What is the name of the award she won for her novel North by Northanger?

Daphne du Maurier Award

Jo Beverley is a RITA award winning historical romance novelist who often sets her stories in Regency-era England. What is the name of her latest novel in the Malloren World series?

A Scandalous Countess

Diana Birchall freely admits to having lost track of how many times she has read Jane Austen’s novels. In her day job, she reads and analyzes many books that might become movies. Name the famous movie studio that she works for.

Warner Brothers

Frank Delaney and Diane Meier are not only talented authors, but they are married. Can you imagine the spirited dinner conversation that ensues at their home? Before becoming an author, Frank was a radio broadcaster for what famous British station, and besides being married to “the most eloquent man in the world”, Diane is the president of what famous marketing firm in Manhattan?

The BBC. MEIER

Monica Fairview has written two Austen-inspired novels: The Other Mr. Darcy and The Darcy Cousins. She has also written a Regency-era novel. What is its name?

An Improper Suitor

Amanda Grange is renowned for her Austen Heroes Diaries series, but her latest novel placed Pride and Prejudice’s famous hero Mr. Darcy and his family on what foreign shore? Clue” Napoleon was also there in 1799?

Egypt

Syrie James is famous for her historical romances, but her latest novel is a young adult paranormal set in contemporary times. Co-written with her son Ryan, what is the name of the heavenly heroine?

Claire Brennan

Janet Mullany writes in a diverse range of romance genres. In any era or genre, she will make you laugh. What is the name of the tag line of her website?

Where wit and passion meet

Jane Odiwe just published her fourth Austen-inspired novel, Searching for Captain Wentworth. Besides being a talented writer, one of her other talents would be considered by Mr. Darcy as one of the necessities of a truly accomplished woman. What is Jane’s second passion? Clue, you can find many examples of her effusions of fancy on her website.

Painter or artist

Beth Pattillo hails from Texas, “which is about as far from England as a girl can get.” She has written three Austen-inspired books that take and American heroine to England. Name one of them.

Jane Austen Ruined My Life, Mr. Darcy Broke My Heart and The Dashwood Sisters Tell All

Alexandra Potter has written ten contemporary romances. What is the name of her latest novel released in the UK in July 2012?

Don’t You Forget About Me

Myretta Robens is the author of two romance novels and the blog mistress of what famous Jane Austen website?

The Republic of Pemberley

Jane Rubino and Caitlen Rubino Bradway are a mother and daughter writing team. Besides being total Austen fans, they are passionate about another English writer, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. Who is his most famous character who has been recently portrayed by actor Robert Downey, Jr.?

Sherlock Homes

Maya Slater gave up her day job to write The Private Diary of Mr. Darcy. Before she was bitten by the writing bug, she was a lecturer of French at which famous English University?

London University

Margaret Sullivan is the famous editrix of Austenblog and passionate promoter of Henry Tilney as Jane Austen’s most underrated hero. What mystery novella did she write that includes him as a main character?

There Must Me Murder

Adriana Trigiani, touted as one of reigning queens of women’s fiction, received rave review for her new novel The Shoemaker’s Wife. Each of her novels is rooted in her strong family origins. Name the country where her family immigrated from.

Italy

Laurie Viera Rigler has a huge sense of humor which is evident in her two Austen Addict novels. She has also written for film. Name her hilarious Babelgum original comedy web series.

Sex and the Austen Girl  

Lauren Willig is the bestselling author of The Pink Carnation series set in Regency-era England and France. She is venturing into a new genre with her new book to be released in April, 2013. What is its name, and what is its connection to Downton Abbey?

The Ashford Affair. Set in the Edwardian era

Cheers,

Laurel Ann

© 2012 Laurel Ann Nattress, Austenprose

Q & A with Jane Austen Made Me Do It Authors: Question 8

Jane Austen Made Me Do It, edited by Laurel Ann Nattress (2011)As my interview of my twenty-four JAMMDI author continues, I open up the floor to one of my favorite topics: Jane Austen at the movies.

Darcy, Darcy, Darcy. Is that what people remember most about Jane Austen movie adaptations? I have enjoyed almost all of the movies, and was very curious what my authors thought of the numerous film adaptation and spinoffs. Their responses were as varied as reader’s reactions to Jane Austen’s characters.

There are many movie and stage adaptations of Jane Austen’s novels. Do you think her stories transfer well to other mediums? Which of the film adaptations do you think captures the spirit of her stories and the nuances of her characters best, and why?
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