Announcing the Celebrating Georgette Heyer Giveaway Winners!


Without further ado – here are all of the giveaway winners in the Celebrating Georgette Heyer event in August, 2010

Day 01   Aug 01 – Review: Georgette Heyer’s Regency World

Melly S., librarypat, Alexa Adams, Elizabeth, and RegencyRomantic

Day 02   Aug 02 – Review: The Black Moth

Lorrie

Day 02   Aug 02 – Review: Powder and Patch

Katherine

Day 03   Aug 04 – Review: These Old Shades

Sandra J.

Day 03   Aug 04 – Review: The Masqueraders Continue reading

‘Celebrating Georgette Heyer’ event wrap-up and poll

This marks the final post of the ‘Celebrating Georgette Heyer‘ event here at Austenprose. It has been a wonderful month of 34 book reviews of her romance novels, guest blogs, interviews and all out Heyer madness. I hope it chased away that fit of the blue-devils.

A big thank you to each of the guest reviewers. Well done. I have learned so much and enjoyed your insights. A big round of applause for Vic of Jane Austen’s World for her wonderful interview, author Helen Simonson for sharing her life-passion for Heyer, the ladies at Teach Me Tonight for their blog on Heyer Heroes and an extra shout out to Deb Werksman of Sourcebooks for her wonderful interview and their donation of the majority of the novels in the giveaways.

Remember, you have until September 6th, 2010 to get your last comments in to qualify for the giveaways and then the winners will be announced on Tuesday September 7th, 2010. Good luck to all. Whoever wins the grand prize of 34 novels is one lucky sod.

Now, one last challenge. Please vote for your top ten favorite Heyer romance novels. I know it’s a tough job to narrow it down, but it is a great way to see who is a diamond of the first water. Continue reading

Heyer’s Heroes: Immutable Romance Archetypes

As the month-long Celebrating Georgette Heyer event draws to a close, we can look back through the thirty-four reviews of Heyer’s romance novels and see a common thread through each and every one. Her heroes are epitomes, nonpareils, and nonesuches. In the Regency romance genre, they are a delight to read and an archetype for a new generation of writers. Each is unique but vaguely similar. Why are they so intriguing? So compelling? So swoon-worthy?

Please welcome Heyer scholars Dr. Laura Vivanco and Sarah S. G. Frantz from the Teach Me Tonight blog as they touch upon Heyer’s genius in creating her heroes, paragons of romance perfection.

Georgette Heyer put her heroes into two basic categories: the Mark I hero, who is “The brusque, savage sort with a foul temper” and the Mark II hero, who is “Suave, well-dressed, rich, and a famous whip” (Aiken-Hodge 49).1 The main distinguishing feature is presumably their tempers, since the “brusque, savage sort with a foul temper” may also be “well-dressed, rich, and a famous whip.” Lord Worth, in Regency Buck, is a case in point:

He was the epitome of a man of fashion. His beaver hat was set over black locks carefully brushed into a semblance of disorder; his cravat of starched muslin supported his chin in a series of beautiful folds; his driving-coat of drab cloth bore no less than fifteen capes, and a double row of silver buttons. Miss Taverner had to own him a very handsome creature, but found no difficulty in detesting the whole cast of his countenance. He had a look of self-consequence; his eyes, ironically surveying her from under weary lids, were the hardest she had ever seen, and betrayed no emotion but boredom. His nose was too straight for her taste. His mouth was very well-formed, firm but thin-lipped. She thought it sneered. (15)2

Continue reading

Lady of Quality, by Georgette Heyer – A Review

Guest review by Elizabeth Hanbury: 

Lady of Quality was Georgette Heyer’s last book before her death in July 1974.  She suffered chronic ill-health in her later years and fractured her leg in a fall in January 1972.  Despite this, she began work on another book and by April had sent the outline to her agent.  Lady of Quality was published in October – an amazing achievement and a tribute to Georgette Heyer’s talent and dedication to her craft.

The heroine is Annis Wychwood and the title sums her up nicely.  Annis is twenty-nine and unmarried (an old maid in Regency terms), but she’s no dowdy spinster.  She’s intelligent, rich, beautiful, elegant and charming, with a sense of humour and an independent spirit.  She lives in Bath with an impoverished cousin, Miss Maria Farlow, as her chaperone.

The book opens with Annis traveling home with Miss Farlow after a visit to her brother and his family.  In spite of her comfortable lifestyle and independence, Annis is bored.  Her future holds no promise of excitement and the well-meaning but prosy Maria only adds to her gloom.  Unsurprisingly, then, when Annis encounters a young couple arguing beside an overturned gig, her curiosity is aroused.  She alights from her carriage to investigate and discovers orphan and heiress Lucilla Carleton is running away from home in the company of her childhood friend Ninian Elmore.  Ninian’s parents and Lucilla’s aunt have been urging them to marry, but it’s a match that neither wants.

Much to the jealous Miss Farlow’s dismay, Annis invites Lucilla to stay until her affairs can be sorted.  Annis enjoys introducing her protégé to Bath society and things go smoothly until Lucilla’s uncle and guardian arrive.  Rakish Oliver Carleton is the rudest man Annis has ever met and sparks fly from their first meeting.  He’s blunt, sardonic and unheeding of society’s rules,  but he’s also honest about his flaws, makes her laugh and is never, ever boring … Continue reading

Charity Girl, by Georgette Heyer – A Review

Guest review by Dana Huff: 

Georgette Heyer’s novel Charity Girl, originally published in 1970, is the story of Ashley Carrington, Viscount Desford’s entanglement with Charity “Cherry” Steane.

Desford’s father wishes Desford, who is approaching thirty, had married family friend Henrietta Silverdale, known affectionately as Hetta, but Desford and Hetta insist, rather too much, that they were not in love. At a party where the Lady Bugle schemes to help her daughter catch the eligible Desford, Desford spots Cherry watching the party from upstairs. He learns through conversation that Cherry is a virtual Cinderella in the Bugle household.

The next day he sees her walking toward London with a suitcase, determined to run away from her Aunt Bugle. When Desford cannot persuade her to return to her aunt, he takes her to London to find her grandfather, the notoriously nasty Lord Nettlecombe, only to learn Nettlecombe is not in London. Desperate to help Cherry, Desford takes her to his friend Hetta, where the Silverdales take care of Cherry while Desford searches for Lord Nettlecombe. Tongues start wagging—why is Desford so interested in helping the girl? Can it be that he has fallen in love with a charity girl?

I have to confess myself disappointed with this novel. I know many consider one of Georgette Heyer’s strengths her facility with Regency slang, but I found much of it incomprehensible, even with my Kindle dictionary. Continue reading