A Cover Reveal & Excerpt of Jane and the Year Without a Summer: Being a Jane Austen Mystery (Book 14), by Stephanie Barron

From the desk of Laurel Ann Nattress: 

I have great news to share today. Bestselling historical mystery author Stephanie Barron has a new “Being a Jane Austen Mystery” in the queue.

Jane and the Year Without a Summer arrives on February 8, 2022, marking the fourteenth novel in the popular series. Set in Regency England, the series is based on actual events and people in Austen’s life and times. Inspired by the author’s life-long admiration of Austen and her writing, Barron’s skill at channeling her voice and the historical detail is nonpareil. Here is a description of the book, the big cover reveal, and an exclusive excerpt from the novel. Continue reading “A Cover Reveal & Excerpt of Jane and the Year Without a Summer: Being a Jane Austen Mystery (Book 14), by Stephanie Barron”

Jane and the Waterloo Map: Being a Jane Austen Mystery (Book 13), by Stephanie Barron – A Review

Waterloo cover x 200From the desk of Christina Boyd:

As a fan of the Being Jane Austen Mystery series, I have been all anticipation for the latest edition, Jane and the Waterloo Map. Author Stephanie Barron knows her Austen lore, as well as a being a masterful storyteller and researcher; writing in a most Austen-like style. She is also The Incomparable when it comes to Regency mysteries. Given that disclaimer, and holding the series in much esteem, I feel quite at liberty to share my impressions herein.

The novel opens with our dear Miss Austen attending her sick brother Henry at his London residence while editing the proofs of her latest novel, Emma, for her publisher John Murray. Summoned to Carlton House, the opulent London mansion of His Royal Highness the Prince Regent, Jane meets his toady Historiographer, Continue reading “Jane and the Waterloo Map: Being a Jane Austen Mystery (Book 13), by Stephanie Barron – A Review”

Join the Jane and the Waterloo Map Blog Tour Starting February 2, 2016

Waterloo cover x 200Long-time readers of Austenprose will remember that I am a big fan of Stephanie Barron’s ‘Being a Jane Austen Mystery’ series. We have reviewed all twelve books to date.

Next week the thirteenth mystery in the series, Jane and the Waterloo Map, will make its debut.

We are thrilled to introduce you to the next exciting mystery in the series, Jane and the Waterloo Map.  Here is a description of the book from the publisher:

BOOK DESCRIPTION

Jane Austen turns sleuth in this delightful Regency-era mystery

November, 1815. The Battle of Waterloo has come and gone, leaving the British economy in shreds; Henry Austen, high-flying banker, is about to declare bankruptcy—dragging several of his brothers down with him. The crisis destroys Henry’s health, and Jane flies to his London bedside, believing him to be dying. While she’s there, the chaplain to His Royal Highness the Prince Regent invites Jane to tour Carlton House, the Prince’s fabulous London home. The chaplain is a fan of Jane’s books, and during the tour he suggests she dedicate her next novel—Emma—to HRH, whom she despises.

However, before she can speak to HRH, Jane stumbles upon a body—sprawled on the carpet in the Regent’s library. The dying man, Colonel MacFarland, was a cavalry hero and a friend of Wellington’s. He utters a single failing phrase: “Waterloo map” . . . and Jane is on the hunt for a treasure of incalculable value and a killer of considerable cunning.

JANE AND WATERLOO - Blog Tour Horizontal

In celebration of the release of Jane and the Waterloo Map, author Stephanie Barron will be touring the blogosphere from February 2 through February 22, 2016. Twenty popular book bloggers specializing in Austenesque fiction, mystery and Regency history will feature guest blogs, interviews, excerpts and book reviews from this highly anticipated novel in the acclaimed series.

TOUR SCHEDULE

  • February 02                My Jane Austen Book Club (Guest Blog)
  • February 03                Laura’s Reviews (Excerpt)  
  • February 04                A Bookish Way of Life (Review)     
  • February 05                The Calico Critic (Review)  
  • February 06                So Little Time…So Much to Read (Excerpt)                                  
  • February 07                Reflections of a Book Addict (Spotlight)                            
  • February 08                Mimi Matthews Blog (Guest Blog)                          
  • February 09                Jane Austen’s World (Interview)                                         
  • February 10                Just Jane 1813 (Review)                                          
  • February 11                Confessions of a Book Addict (Excerpt)                             
  • February 12                History of the 18th and 19th Centuries (Guest Blog)                       
  • February 13                My Jane Austen Book Club (Interview)                              
  • February 14                Living Read Girl (Review)                           
  • February 14                Austenprose (Review)
  • February 15                Mystery Fanfare (Guest Blog)                                 
  • February 16                Laura’s Reviews (Review)                                       
  • February 17                Jane Austen in Vermont (Excerpt)                                      
  • February 18                From Pemberley to Milton (Interview)                                            
  • February 19                More Agreeably Engaged (Review)
  • February 20                Babblings of a Bookworm (Review)                                    
  • February 21                A Covent Garden Gilflurt’s Guide to Life (Guest Blog)
  • February 22                Diary of an Eccentric (Review) 

I hope to see you along the tour. It should be a fun event.

Cheers, Laurel Ann

Cover image courtesy of Soho Press © 2016; text Laurel Ann Nattress © 2016, Austenprose.com

Jane and the Twelve Days of Christmas: Being a Jane Austen Mystery (Book 12), by Stephanie Barron – A Review

Jane and the Twelve Days of Christmas by Stephanie Barron 2014From the desk of Jenny Haggerty:

The holidays make me nostalgic for past times I’ve never actually experienced, so I leapt at the chance to spend the Yuletide season with Jane Austen. Jane and the Twelve Days of Christmas is the twelfth installment in a series that features one of my favorite novelists as an amateur sleuth, but so far I hadn’t managed to read one of them. It seemed high time to rectify that lapse, especially since author Stephanie Barron studied European history in college and then worked as a CIA analyst, highly suitable credentials for writing a story of intrigue set in the past.

The book opens on a blizzardy, bitterly cold evening with Jane Austen, her mother, and her sister Cassandra traveling by coach to the home of Jane’s eldest brother James and his family in Hampshire. Unfortunately, when they reach the end of the public line the women find that James has sent an unlighted open horse cart for the last few miles of their journey, even though it’s dark outside and blowing Continue reading “Jane and the Twelve Days of Christmas: Being a Jane Austen Mystery (Book 12), by Stephanie Barron – A Review”

Jane and the Barque of Frailty: Being a Jane Austen Mystery (Book 9), by Stephanie Barron – A Review

Jane and the Barque of Frailty: Being a Jane Austen Mystery, by Stephanie Barron (2007)Here we are at the ninth novel in the Being a Jane Austen Mystery series, Stephanie Barron’s sagacious slant on “our dear Jane” as a sleuth!

The spring of 1811 finds Jane in London staying with her banker-brother Henry Austen and his sophisticated wife Eliza at their residence on Sloane Street preparing her first novel, Sense and Sensibility, for publication. While attending a performance of Macbeth at the Theatre Royal at Covent Garden, it is difficult to determine who is the bigger draw to the audience; the esteemed actress Mrs. Siddons on stage, or the beautiful Russian Princess Evegenia Tscholikova in a box. That very week, her private letters to her married lover Lord Castlereagh had been published in a London paper for all to read. Such a shocking scandal for a Tory Minister is sure to have serious repercussions, but finding the lifeless body of the Princess strewn across the his front steps the next morning with her throat cut should not be one of them. Jane and Eliza are shocked, but certain that it is not the suicide that the paper reports. Continue reading “Jane and the Barque of Frailty: Being a Jane Austen Mystery (Book 9), by Stephanie Barron – A Review”

Jane and the Canterbury Tale Blog Tour with Author Stephanie Barron

Jane and the Cantebury Tale, by Stephanie Barron (2011)Please join us today in welcoming author Stephanie Barron on her book blog tour in celebration of her eleventh novel in the Being a Jane Austen Mysteries series, Jane and the Canterbury Tale to be released tomorrow by Bantam Books.

Walking Godmersham in Search of a Tale

About a dozen years or so ago, when my elder son was still a toddler and my younger not yet born, I left Sam in the care of a nanny and his dad, and wandered around England alone.  I had ten days to myself, and the trip would have been intensely boring to anybody but me—no Tower of London, no Blenheim, no flying trip to Warwick Castle.  The itinerary was entirely dictated by places Jane Austen had lived.  I had written two books about her and intended to write more; but I needed a visual sense of all the places she had known, or could possibly have used herself as settings for her novels.

In some cases, it was easy to find her—in Bath, for example, where a cottage industry in Austen Walking Tours is thriving.  Other places were more challenging.  I was intrigued by the possibility that Jane had actually visited the town of Bakewell in Derbyshire, three miles from the ducal seat of Chatsworth—a town she actually mentions in Pride and Prejudice, although tradition insists she was never there.  She might have gone to Bakewell, possibly, while spending six weeks with her cousin Edmund Cooper in his tiny village of Hamstall-Ridware, Staffordshire.  Having seen the easy places—Portsmouth and Southampton, Chawton and Bath, Hans Crescent in London—I threw myself behind the right-handed wheel of a rented car and took to the carriageways, as highways are called in England.  They terrified me.  I consistently made the mistake of hugging the right lane of multi-lane roads, thinking it would be the “slow” lane—except, of course, in a reverse-world it was the fast lane, and I was the object of frustration and ridicule. Continue reading “Jane and the Canterbury Tale Blog Tour with Author Stephanie Barron”

Jane and the Prisoner of the Wool House: Being a Jane Austen Mystery (Book 6), by Stephanie Barron – A Review

Jane and the Prisoner of the Wool House, Being the Sixth Jane Austen Mystery, by Stephanie Barron (2002)In the winter of 1807, we find Jane Austen in the seaport of Southampton living in hired lodgings while her brother Francis Austen’s new residence is made ready for them at Castle Square. The Austen women (Jane, sister Cassandra, their widowed mother, and a dear family friend Martha Lloyd), will all be residing together under her brother’s kind graces. He is at present a landlocked Royal Navy post-captain anxiously awaiting his next assignment, and his first child.

News has reached Frank of a possible new ship, but the circumstances of its availability are a two-edged sword. Its previous captain is a personal friend, Thomas Seagrave, who has been charged with violating the Articles of War by murdering an unarmed French captain during a siege. The prime witness to the assault is Seagrave’s first lieutenant, Eustace Chessyre, an older officer who has been passed by many times for promotion. The case against Continue reading “Jane and the Prisoner of the Wool House: Being a Jane Austen Mystery (Book 6), by Stephanie Barron – A Review”

Jane and the Madness of Lord Byron: Being a Jane Austen Mystery, by Stephanie Barron – A Review

One thinks of Jane Austen as a retiring spinster who writes secretly, prefers her privacy and enjoys quiet walks in the Hampshire countryside. Instead, she has applied her intuitive skills of astute observation and deductive reasoning to solve crime in Stephanie Barron’s Austen inspired mystery series. It is an ingenious paradox that would make even Gilbert and Sullivan green with envy. The perfect pairing of the unlikely with the obvious that happens occasionally in great fiction by authors clever enough to pick up on the connection and run with it.

Jane and the Madness of Lord Byron marks Stephanie Barron’s tenth novel in the best-selling Jane Austen Mystery series. For fourteen years, and to much acclaim, she has channeled our Jane beyond her quiet family circle into sleuthing adventures with lords, ladies and murderers. Cleverly crafted, this historical detective series incorporates actual events from Jane Austen’s life with historical facts from her time all woven together into mysteries that of course, only our brilliant Jane can solve. Continue reading “Jane and the Madness of Lord Byron: Being a Jane Austen Mystery, by Stephanie Barron – A Review”

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