The Winter Companion (Parish Orphans of Devon Book 4), by Mimi Matthews—A Review

The Winter Companion, by Mimi Matthews (2020)From the desk of Debbie Brown:

Neville Cross doesn’t fit the mold for a leading character. He’s appeared in the previous books of this series in a relatively minor role, and that’s where he seemed to belong. It’s true that, physically, his description as “a gentle giant” and “[a] handsome, golden Galahad” ordinarily would make him an ideal protagonist. Unfortunately, his personal history dispels the visual image. He doesn’t own his own estate, doesn’t have a boatload of money, and doesn’t have much in the way of charm. He grew up dirt poor in a miserable orphanage, where he experienced hunger and neglect. His years working and living at a convent in the neighboring village weren’t any kinder to him. Fortunately, his successful childhood friend, Justin Thornhill, brought him to live at the VERY remote Grayfriar’s Abbey. Most significantly, though, a serious head injury when Neville was just a lad continues to affect his word-finding ability; he’s incapable of speaking with any eloquence. Due to his halting speech, the poor man is more comfortable in the stables with the animals than in the house. He has no desire to see the world, feeling safe where he is and avoiding people he doesn’t know. Not exactly the adventurous, swashbuckling hero type. It takes a talented author like Mimi Matthews to allow Neville to shine as he does in her newly released The Winter Companion (Parish Orphans of Devon #4).

The “companion” in the title refers to Clara Hartwright, Ms. Matthews’ equally unlikely heroine. Justin and his wife, Lady Helena, are hosting his two friends and their wives for a month-long Christmas house party at Grayfriar’s Abbey, along with Neville, of course. Clara arrives as a paid companion to Mrs. Bainbridge, aunt of one of the wives. Clara’s brother Simon currently attends Cambridge, an experience she herself covets but is not attainable for a woman. As reparation for some dreadful misstep Clara made that ended both Simon’s tutoring lessons and her teaching position at the village school, she pays his university bills from her wages. More importantly, Simon has agreed to send copies of all his lesson notes so Clara can learn along with him. She hopes eventually to leave her current employment behind. “She couldn’t attend a proper university, or earn a position in the scientific community. But there was nothing stopping her from being a secretary to a scientist, or a gentleman with an interest in natural history.” Continue reading