Her Summer at Pemberley: Kitty Bennet’s Story, by Sallianne Hines—A Review

Her Summer at Pemberley by Sallianne Hines 2020From the desk of Katie Jackson:

In Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice, Kitty Bennet—the fourth of five sisters—has always been something of an enigma. Her father thought her silly, but mostly she was just an easygoing follower, overshadowed by the gregarious personality of her younger sister and the cleverness or beauty of her older ones. Imagine, if you will, a slightly older and more mature Kitty. Three of her sisters have married, and she’s yearning for a new life of her own. On that note begins Kitty Bennet’s story in Her Summer at Pemberley, a Pride and Prejudice sequel by Sallianne Hines.

At nearly 19 years old, Kitty Bennet “was still seen as merely a dimmer version of Lydia. How could Kitty gain respectability and marry well?” (1) “With an indifferent education, a less than respectable fortune, and a family estate entailed away, Kitty’s prospects were bleak at best.” (2)

Forlorn over her seemingly dismal future at Longbourn, she requests and is granted an invitation to visit her older sister, Elizabeth Darcy, at Pemberley.

“This visit would be a new beginning, away from her dull childhood home and the same tiresome people. Kitty was determined to prove herself worthy of a fine future, but she needed assistance.” (5) And assistance soon arrives in the form of a grand ball to be hosted by Darcy and Lizzy in her honor. Kitty will officially make her debut in society on her nineteenth birthday. The Darcys invite all of their dearest friends and neighbors to join in the festivities, and it seems this is the new beginning Kitty had been hoping for. She could finally enjoy the great pleasure of developing loyal and lasting friendships with other genteel ladies and gentlemen. Most importantly, she is finally at liberty to establish a close connection with her own sister Lizzy, as well as Mr. Darcy’s sister Georgiana, and even Mr. Darcy himself. Reliable relationships she never knew she was missing until she’d discovered them. “This was new—having others interested in knowing her, without the interference of a dominating sister.” (38) Continue reading