New Jane Austen Stamps On Sale Today in the UK and Online

Jane Austen Stamps (2013)

The Royal Mail has released six new Jane Austen stamps today in honor of the 200th anniversary of the publication of Pride and Prejudice. Designed by artist Angela Barrett, they include illustrations of scenes from the six major novels: Sense and Sensibility and Pride and Prejudice as first-class stamps and Mansfield Park, Emma, Northanger Abbey and Persuasion in other values, and can be purchased through the Royal Mail Shop online. My favorite is the illustration from Northanger Abbey which includes the ponderous chest so mysterious to heroine Catherine Morland.

There are several collectors sets to select from including a special Presentation Pack with additional text by author P.D. James and a First Day Cover pack where the special stamps are affixed to a cover featuring a Jane Austen signature and cancelled with a Steventon, Basingstoke postmark, chosen because it was the home of Jane Austen for many years.

Jane Austen Presentation Pack (2013)

The Royal Mail also announced that letters posted in Chawton in Hampshire, where Austen spent her last years, and Steventon, near Basingstoke, where she was born, will have a special postmark for a week, featuring the Pride and Prejudice quote “Do anything rather than marry without affection”. Continue reading “New Jane Austen Stamps On Sale Today in the UK and Online”

Naxos AudioBooks Offers Giveaway of New Pride and Prejudice Alert Tone

Naxos AudioBooks Pride and Prejudice Ringtone (2013)

Last month I reviewed the Naxos Audiobooks edition of Pride and Prejudice, read by Emilia Fox. It is my favorite audio edition of Jane Austen’s classic novel. I was thrilled to learn that they have also created in honor of this year’s bicentenary of publication a clever alert tone for iPhone, iPad or iPod Touch of a select section of the recording.

Wouldn’t it be totally cool and so chic to have actress Emilia Fox as Elizabeth Bennet saying, “It is your turn to say something now, Mr. Darcy.” when you receive a new email or text message on your electronic device? Well, now you can.

It is only accessible within the iTunes store on your iOS device. Once it is downloaded, you can set your new tone as your default tone or assign it to a Contact. Why not try it?

Gentle readers, please bear with this Luddite who does not own a cell phone, iPod or iPad. If I make a mistake in the description or process to purchase, please forgive me. My computer and NOOK are as a techie as I get.

Here are the instructions:

Available from:

Apple Mobile App Store (iPhone, iPad, iPod Touch)

Tones

You cannot purchase ringtones and alert tones from your computer, but you can purchase them using your iOS device with iOS 5 or later. You can purchase tones on iPad, iPhone (3GS or later), and iPod touch (4th generation or later).

To locate tones in iTunes on an iOS device:

  1. Tap the iTunes app.
  2. Tap Tones. If Tones is not visible, tap More > Tones.
  3. Browse for tones. Once you purchase a tone, a dialog is displayed. The dialog gives you an option to set your new tone as your default tone or assign it to a Contact.   If you don’t want to do anything with the tone just yet, simply tap Done.
  4. Tones purchased using your iOS devices are synced to your iTunes library when you connect your device to your computer. On an iPod touch or iPhone, you can find tones in Settings > Sounds. On an iPad, you can find tones in Settings > General > Sounds.

A Grand Giveaway

Naxos AudioBooks graphicNaxos Audiobooks has generously offered 6 alert tones of Elizabeth Bennet saying, “It’s your turn to say something now, Mr. Darcy.” available to Austenprose readers. You must have iOS device. Just leave a comment stating what quote from P&P you would like them to create next! It must be one sentence. The contest ends at 11:59 pm on Wednesday, February 13, 2013. Winners will be announced on Thursday, February 14, 2013. They will receive an iTunes card to purchase their new Pride and Prejudice alert tone. Good luck!

2013 Naxos Audiobook, Austenprose

Roundup of Pride and Prejudice Turning 200 and other Amusements

The Kiss, by Janet Taylor

Illustration of The Kiss, from a note card by Janet Taylor

This has been a heady week of Pride and Prejudice blitz from the media and bloggers celebrating the 200th anniversary of its publication on Monday, January 28, 2013. There have been so many articles, interviews, read-a-thons, television news segments, and Internet chat about Jane Austen’s “darling child” that even this confessed Austen obsessive is overwhelmed and unable to keep up with all of the festivities.  I was shocked to hear another Austenesque author tell me that she was sick of it. “What?” I exclaimed incredulously. “No! This is great for Jane’s fame and for authors,” I told her defensively.  She shrugged and agreed.

It is very gratifying to me to see my favorite author so amply admired by so many and honored by scholars and the media. In a world filled with so much uncertainty and unrest, Pride and Prejudice is indeed a truth universally acknowledged. I think it will be around and venerated as long as people value pithy dialogue, intelligent, spunky heroines, honorable heroes, and compelling love stories. If I had to narrow down why it is my favorite novel, I would say because it is such a chameleon: after repeated annual readings over thirty plus years, I always come to the final passage with some new insight and a calming satisfaction that some things in life are constant.

Here is my roundup of favorite #PandP200 articles:

Jane Odiwe, BBC interview (2013)

The enduring appeal of Pride and Prejudice

Our friend and Jane Austen Made Me Do It short story contributor Jane Odiwe is interviewed by the BBC. Jane, the author of four Austen-inspired novels, and numerous illustrations of her favorite Austen characters and scenes, admits to being obsessed with Jane Austen to the world. Brave, Jane. We love you!

Austen Power

“To mark the 200th anniversary of Pride and Prejudice, novelists, moviemakers and scholars are releasing a flood of new homages to cash in on the bottomless appetite for all things Austen.” The Wall Street Journal interviews Austen authors Sharon Lathan and Paula Byrne, publishers Oxford University Press, HarperFiction and Sourcebooks, scholars Juliette Wells and Claudia Johnson, and fan Meredith Esparza for this extensive article about Austen’s enduring appeal. Wowza! It got a full page spread in the print edition. Go #TeamJane!

200 Years of Pride and Prejudice Book Design

There are thousands of editions of P&P (it seems) and we love to discover cover designs, old and new. This article in the The Atlantic Wire shares many of the good, the bad, and the horrid, including ones that I included in a post My Top Ten Pride and Prejudice Covers that I wrote in 2010. I guess I was ahead of the trend.

Colin Firth dripping wet with sex as Mr. Darcy in Pride and Prejudice (1995)

Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice: Darcy is still the ultimate sex symbol

Like this is a surprise? The Telegraph (UK newspaper) offers up this cream puff of a piece on a truth already universally acknowledged by any Janeite worth their weight in syllabub. *yawn* We still like seeing wet shirt Darcy and enjoyed the history of his on screen persona thank you very much!

Why Jane Austen’s Pride And Prejudice still has appeal 200 years on

Professor Karen O’Brien, Austen expert, Pro-Vice-Chancellor (Education) and Professor of English Literature at the University of Birmingham, explains why Pride and Prejudice’s appeal has spanned two centuries – and is still growing.

Pride and Prejudice is an enduring classic because it is really about the human instinct to pursue happiness, to insist that happiness is something we are all entitled to (no matter what the Lady Catherine de Bourghs of this world tell us) and to believe that those who are generous, affectionate and self-aware stand the best chance of becoming happy.

The love story is fundamentally about that path to self-awareness, and how a genuinely intimate relationship is a mutual journey in which we come to know ourselves, each other and the world.

We are reminded of Austen’s rub of Birmingham in Emma. I think they have forgiven her.

A Tweet Universally Acknowledged

How would the Netherfield ball play out on Twitter? Austenesque author Lynn Shepherd’s delightful imaginings of a Twitter feed if the Bennet girls could tweet and Darcy could DM. Even Mr. Collins has his say. How he condensed his flowery soliloquies down to 140 characters is quite a feat.

Chatsworth House, Derbyshire, England

Following in Jane Austen’s Footsteps: Discover Novelist’s England

A video look at Chatsworth House, the famous grand manor in Derbyshire that many believe was Jane Austen’s inspiration for Pemberley, Mr. Darcy’s estate in Pride and Prejudice. Ooo, we are always awed by its magnificence and are reminded of this passage from chapter 43:

Elizabeth’s mind was too full for conversation, but she saw and admired every remarkable spot and point of view. They gradually ascended for half a mile, and then found themselves at the top of a considerable eminence, where the wood ceased, and the eye was instantly caught by Pemberley House, situated on the opposite side of a valley, into which the road with some abruptness wound. It was a large, handsome stone building, standing well on rising ground, and backed by a ridge of high woody hills; and in front a stream of some natural importance was swelled into greater, but without any artificial appearance. Its banks were neither formal nor falsely adorned. Elizabeth was delighted. She had never seen a place for which nature had done more, or where natural beauty had been so little counteracted by an awkward taste. They were all of them warm in their admiration; and at that moment she felt that to be mistress of Pemberley might be something!

Janeites: The curious American cult of Jane Austen

BBC News interviewed Janeites and scholars about the phenomenon of Pride and Prejudice and Jane’s fame here in America including blog mistress and author Myretta Robens of The Republic of Pemberley, professor of English Literature at Princeton University and esteemed Austen scholar Claudia L Johnson, and me. Yes, you read that correctly. ME. In our best imitation of Mr. Collins, we were very humbled that the esteemed BBC condescended to interview us on such an auspicious occasion.

Which—leads me to my own personal Pride and Prejudice 200 encounter at work on Wednesday with a non-Janeite sent on an errand by his teenage daughter.

Customer: Do you have a copy of Pride and Prejudice?
Me: *smiles* Why yes, we have several editions. Is this a gift or for yourself?
Customer: It’s for my 14-year old daughter who has never had an interest in reading classics before. She gave me this news article and asked for this book too, written by some Jane Austen cultist who lives in our hometown of Snohomish.
Me: *Nods in stunned silence. Looks at article.* Yes, I am familiar with the article and the book.
Customer: Really? What a coincidence!
Me: Monday was the bicentenary of the publication of Pride and Prejudice. It was all over the media and television. *walks customer over to Austen shelf in fiction and then to anthologies for Jane Austen Made Me Do It.
Customer: *points at cover of Jane Austen Made Me Do It* Do you know anything about this book?
Me: *pregnant pause* I do. I am the Jane Austen cultist who lives in Snohomish.
Customer: *Stares in stunned silence and then laughs loudly*
Me: *calmly smiles* I hope she enjoys both books!
Customer: *still laughing, he nods his thanks and walks away*

Happy bicentenary Pride and Prejudice!

If you would like to continue the celebration with us here at Austenprose, please join The Pride and Prejudice Bicentenary Challenge 2013. We are reading Jane Austen’s classic and many Austen-inspired sequels, viewing movie adaptations and other diverting entertainments with great giveaway prizes all year long.

Cheers,

Laurel Ann

© 2013 Laurel Ann Nattress, Austenprose

A Light, Bright, and Sparkling Pride and Prejudice Anniversary Celebration & Giveaway

Mr. Darcy & Elizabeth Bennet, Pride and Prejudice (1995)Huzzah Janeites! Today is the 200th anniversary of the publication of Jane Austen’s classic novel Pride and Prejudice. *throws confetti*

The exact day of publication of Pride and Prejudice is uncertain, but we do know from Austen’s personal correspondence that she had received her own copy from her publisher by January 27, 1813, and the London newspaper The Morning Chronicle announced Pride and Prejudice as ‘Published this Day’ on 28 January 1813. So, that is the date that scholars have accepted.

You will see all sorts of media coverage this week, including this BBC news article, and many others about this worldwide celebration, but the Jane Austen blogosphere is having their own party in honor of this fabulous novel with a Blog Hop hosted by Courtney at Stiletto Storytime and author Alyssa Goodnight. See the great list of giveaways that we are offering to readers below!

If you would like your celebration of Pride and Prejudice to continue, please join us here at Austenprose for The Pride and Prejudice Bicentenary Challenge 2013. We are reading the classic novel and exploring many of the many novels, books, movies and entertainments that it has inspired with a monthly review and discussion. It’s totally free and guaranteed fun. Continue reading “A Light, Bright, and Sparkling Pride and Prejudice Anniversary Celebration & Giveaway”

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