Book Reviews, Regency Era, Regency Romance

School for Love: The Hapgoods of Bramleigh (Book 3), by Christina Dudley – A Review

School for Love, by Christina Dudley 2020From the desk of Katie Patchell:

Besides their prominent place on many Regency fans’ bookshelves, Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice and Georgette Heyer’s Frederica have another trait in common: Their plots revolve around a group of loud, lovable, and independent people who have the good fortune to call each other ‘family.’ While our lively Elizabeth Bennet might complain (if given the chance for an interview) about her claustrophobic world, the charm and humor of Pride and Prejudice would be lost without the rest of the Bennet clan. Despite the familial meddling in these two great works, the heroines and heroes find love and, perhaps equal in worth, readers enjoy hours of amusement at their antics. Since 2013’s release of The Naturalist, Christina Dudley has followed in the footsteps of Austen and Heyer in her series, “The Hapgoods of Bramleigh Hall.” School for Love, her latest installment, continues the story of the eccentric Hapgoods and their hilariously romantic escapades.

As an unmarried member of a small community, Rosemary DeWitt has long worn the label of spinster. It isn’t that she’s afraid of marriage; rather, she refuses to marry a man who desires her solely for her wealth. As Rosemary busies herself by championing the right of education for her village’s young women, she hides her growing sense of discontent, only showing her free-spirited side to her parents and brothers. That is until a solemn-faced, sparkling-eyed visitor arrives in town. Continue reading “School for Love: The Hapgoods of Bramleigh (Book 3), by Christina Dudley – A Review”

Book Reviews, Regency Era, Regency Romance

A Very Plain Young Man: Book Two of The Hapgoods of Bramleigh, by Christina Dudley – A Review

A Very Plain Young Man by Christina Dudley 2014 x 200From the desk of Katie P.:

In most novels, the heroine has some kind of quirk, trait, flaw, or unique quality—physical or otherwise–which the hero (and the reader) falls in love with. She could have a temper (Serena, Bath Tangle) or a limp (Sorrel, Friends and Foes). She might stutter (Horry, The Convenient Marriage) or make judgments too quickly (Elizabeth, Pride and Prejudice). She could love to twirl (Marianne, Edenbrooke) or love to take charge (Sophy, The Grand Sophy). She might be stubborn (Margaret Hale, North and South) or love matchmaking (Emma, Emma). She might love to read novels (Catherine, Northanger Abbey) or collect insects and plants (Alice, The Naturalist). The list could go on and on. But the one characteristic not often seen (or even seen) in a Regency heroine is shortsightedness. In Christina Dudley’s latest continuation of the Hapgoods of Bramleigh series, A Very Plain Young Man, readers meet a rake in need of a bride…and a heroine in need of spectacles.

Frederick Tierney is three things: the heir to two estates, a rake, and an extremely handsome man (which he is very much aware). While in London, he breaks off his relationship with his latest conquest, for the first time getting tired of living the life of a profligate (which disappoints his family), saying false ‘I love you’s’ and being chased after by shallow women. He travels to Somerset for his younger brother’s wedding, and to escape his ex-lover’s clutches, he sends her a letter saying he’s soon to be married. Continue reading “A Very Plain Young Man: Book Two of The Hapgoods of Bramleigh, by Christina Dudley – A Review”

Book Reviews, Regency Era, Sweet Historical Romance

The Naturalist: Book One of The Hapgoods of Bromleigh, by Christina Dudley – A Review

The Naturalist: Book One of The Hapgoods of Bromleigh, by Christina Dudley (2013)From the desk of Laurel Ann Nattress:

Traditional Regency Romance has had its ebb and flow in popularity over the years. This subgenre of romance novels was made famous by English writer Georgette Heyer with its roots deeply entwined in Jane Austen’s novels of manners and courtship. By 2005, trends were shifting and readers preferred the freedom of the Regency Historical which allowed more intimate relationships and daring plots. In the past few years, I have seen a resurgence in popularity of the Traditional Regency Romance and credit authors Candice Hern, Carla Kelly, Julie Klassen, Julianne Donaldson and Sarah M. Eden for its renaissance. Now, I am very pleased to add one more author to my list of favorites, Christina Dudley.

I first became aware of Dudley’s talent when I read The Beresfords, a modern retelling of Jane Austen’s Mansfield Park. She had successfully transformed Austen’s dark horse into an interesting and thoughtful contemporary novel receiving such accolades as “brilliant,” “masterful,” and “endearing” from reviewers. Truly amazing. Imagine my delight when I discovered that her next novel, The Naturalist, would be a Traditional Regency, and, it was the first book in a series! Continue reading “The Naturalist: Book One of The Hapgoods of Bromleigh, by Christina Dudley – A Review”

Book Reviews, Jane Austen Contemporary Inspired Book Reviews

The Beresfords, by Christina Dudley – A Review

The Beresfords, by Christina Dudley (2012)From the desk of Lisa Galek

If you are one of those Austen fans who think it’s a shame that Mansfield Park is so rarely adapted for modern audiences, then The Beresfords will be a welcome addition to your reading list.

When six-year-old Frannie Price is removed from the care of her drug-addicted mother and sent to live in a foster home, her mother’s sister, Marie, and her husband, Paul, sweep in (at the instance of Paul’s overbearing sister, Terri) and bring the girl to live with them in California. There, Frannie grows up in a large, luxurious home with her four older cousins (step cousins, really. They’re her uncle’s children from his previous marriage).

The oldest, Tom, is clearly the troublemaker of the bunch. The two younger sisters, Rachel and Julie, spend most of their time either arguing or ignoring Frannie. Only Jonathan, a devout Christian who is determined to one day become a pastor, shows Frannie any kindness. He soon becomes her closest friend, confidant, and, in Frannie’s heart, so much more.

In the summer of 1985, when the shy, introverted Frannie turns fourteen, Tom brings the Grant twins home from college for a visit. Frannie is instantly repulsed by Eric Grant, who flirts openly with both Rachel and Julie, playing the two sisters against each other. But the beautiful and graceful Caroline Grant, who rarely takes anything seriously and is bored by religion, easily captures Jonathan’s attention. The story plays out over the course of the next seven years, in which Frannie’s admiration and love for Jonathan are tested, her bonds with her family are strained, and she is tempted by the very person she despised all those years ago.

Mansfield Park is one of Austen’s works that’s hardly ever given a contemporary spin. Pride and Prejudice is a much more popular choice, probably because the witty, determined, Elizabeth Bennet transitions so seamlessly into a present-day heroine. The same is true of Emma Woodhouse and Marianne Dashwood. There’s something so modern and appealing about their style that it’s easy to imagine them walking around in our world.

But not every young woman sparkles with wit, charm, and confidence. That’s why the bookstore needs characters like Fanny Price. Though she’s often written off as an uptight prig, Fanny is also a dazzlingly complex character.

The Beresfords achieves the near impossible feat of staying true to Austen’s creation, while bringing her convincingly into the 20th century. The author does this by making her Frannie a very religious girl who quotes the Bible and lives by a strict Christian moral code (which she learned mainly from her beloved cousin, Jonathan). Here, Frannie is pious without being insufferable. Her reliance on scripture, her concern and love for others, and her continual striving for goodness seem natural and consistent. Like many shy girls before her, Frannie struggles to follow her convictions but, eventually, grows in self-esteem and confidence in her own choices.

Austen’s other characters are all convincingly updated and (dare I say it) even improved at times. Jonathan is as admirable and yet, at times, clueless as Edmund ever was. The other Beresford children and their parents are equally well done. Mrs. Norris becomes the micro-managing Aunt Terri, who is forever going around picking on Frannie and telling everyone how much things cost. She’s delightful and terrible at the same time.

The plot adheres very closely to Mansfield Park, but every moment feels fresh and new. The stakes are heightened to give modern readers the jolt they need. For example, Eric Grant can no longer just flirt with Rachel Beresford in front of her boyfriend, he has to seduce her into surrendering her virginity. The ending, which is expanded from Austen’s original, actually made my heart pound and tears run down my face.

My one quarrel with the book was the dialogue. Teenagers growing up in California in the 1980’s just didn’t talk like this:

“You aren’t going inside, are you, Frannie?” [Caroline asked] “That was so helpful of you to explain Greg’s point of view. I would’ve had no idea he was the religious type… I bet you think it was mean of Eric, what he did to Greg.”

I nodded once. She might act like we were having a private conversation, but she didn’t lower her voice any.

“It was,” Caroline agreed. “You’re right. And you know what, even if that kind of stuff happens all the time in college – and I’m afraid it does – that didn’t make it less mean, does it?”

“I don’t think so,” I said in a low voice.

“I know so,” said Caroline. “You’ve convinced me. Eric must apologize to Greg. And Greg must forgive Eric. If he doesn’t I’ll set you on him, Frannie, and you can tell him exactly what you told us – that it’s his religious duty.” She smiled at me. “We’re going to see a lot of each other this summer you know, your family and mine. We can’t have anyone mad at anyone. I dub thee Frannie the Peacemaker.”

However, overall, the writing is very good quality.

I would rank The Beresfords with some of the best Austen updates I’ve ever read or seen. The author clearly knows and loves Mansfield Park and has taken her characters on wonderful journey. That’s what every Austenesque author hopes to write and every Janeite hopes to read. I hope you enjoy it as much as I did.

4.5 out of 5 Stars

The Beresfords, by Christina Dudley
Bellavita Press (2012)
Trade paperback (402) pages
ISBN: 978-0983072126

© 2012 Lisa Galek, Austenprose