Matchless Margaret: The Hapgoods of Bramleigh (Book 4), by Christina Dudley — A Review  

From the desk of Katie Patchell:  

Who has seen the 1999 Wives and Daughters miniseries, adapted from Elizabeth Gaskell’s Victorian classic? It’s a powerful study of 19th-century life in a small English village, played by a phenomenal cast. Because of the miniseries, I recently devoured the 720-page volume and subsequently forced a family member to read it (which was a heroic accomplishment, because this specific family member has “Large Book Phobia”). Who can forget Squire Hamley, the character who acts like a character? To him, the Hamleys of Hamley Hall have a long history of honor to uphold…but they never quite live up to his Continue reading “Matchless Margaret: The Hapgoods of Bramleigh (Book 4), by Christina Dudley — A Review  “

School for Love: The Hapgoods of Bramleigh (Book 3), by Christina Dudley – A Review

From the desk of Katie Patchell:

Besides their prominent place on many Regency fans’ bookshelves, Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice and Georgette Heyer’s Frederica have another trait in common: Their plots revolve around a group of loud, lovable, and independent people who have the good fortune to call each other ‘family.’ While our lively Elizabeth Bennet might complain (if given the chance for an interview) about her claustrophobic world, the charm and humor of Pride and Prejudice would be lost without the rest of the Bennet clan. Despite the familial meddling in these two great works, the heroines and heroes find love and, perhaps equal in worth, readers enjoy hours of amusement at their antics. Since 2013’s release of The Naturalist, Christina Continue reading “School for Love: The Hapgoods of Bramleigh (Book 3), by Christina Dudley – A Review”

A Very Plain Young Man: The Hapgoods of Bramleigh (Book 2), by Christina Dudley – A Review

From the desk of Katie Patchell:

In most novels, the heroine has some kind of quirk, trait, flaw, or unique quality—physical or otherwise–which the hero (and the reader) falls in love with. She could have a temper (Serena, Bath Tangle) or a limp (Sorrel, Friends and Foes). She might stutter (Horry, The Convenient Marriage) or make judgments too quickly (Elizabeth, Pride and Prejudice). She could love to twirl (Marianne, Edenbrooke) or love to take charge (Sophy, The Grand Sophy). She might be stubborn (Margaret Hale, North and South) or love matchmaking (Emma, Emma). She might love to read novels (Catherine, Northanger Abbey) or collect Continue reading “A Very Plain Young Man: The Hapgoods of Bramleigh (Book 2), by Christina Dudley – A Review”

The Naturalist: The Hapgoods of Bromleigh (Book 1), by Christina Dudley – A Review

From the desk of Laurel Ann Nattress:

Traditional Regency Romance has had its ebb and flow in popularity over the years. This subgenre of romance novels was made famous by English writer Georgette Heyer with its roots deeply entwined in Jane Austen’s novels of manners and courtship. By 2005, trends were shifting and readers preferred the freedom of the Regency Historical which allowed more intimate relationships and daring plots. In the past few years, I have seen a resurgence in popularity of the Traditional Regency Romance and credit authors Continue reading “The Naturalist: The Hapgoods of Bromleigh (Book 1), by Christina Dudley – A Review”

The Beresfords, by Christina Dudley – A Review

The Beresfords, by Christina Dudley (2012)From the desk of Lisa Galek: 

If you are one of those Austen fans who think it’s a shame that Mansfield Park is so rarely adapted for modern audiences, then The Beresfords will be a welcome addition to your reading list.

When six-year-old Frannie Price is removed from the care of her drug-addicted mother and sent to live in a foster home, her mother’s sister, Marie, and her husband, Paul, sweep in (at the instance of Paul’s overbearing sister, Terri) and bring the girl to live with them in California. There, Frannie grows up in a large, luxurious home with her four older cousins (step cousins, really. They’re her uncle’s children from his previous marriage).

The oldest, Tom, is clearly the troublemaker of the bunch. The two younger sisters, Rachel and Julie, spend most of their time either arguing or ignoring Frannie. Only Jonathan, a devout Christian who Continue reading “The Beresfords, by Christina Dudley – A Review”

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