Aerendgast: The Lost History of Jane Austen Blog Tour with Author Rachel Berman

Aerendgast The Lost History Rachel Berman 2015 x 200Please help me welcome debut author Rachel Berman to Austenprose today on the first stop of her blog tour in celebration of the release of Aerendgast: The Lost History of Jane Austen published by Meryton Press. Inspired by actual events in Jane Austen’s life, Rachel has generously contributed a guest blog sharing her thoughts about her writing experience.

If you are as curious by the title of this novel as I was, you might want to read this preview and excerpt that we presented last month, and then join the blog tour as it continues through March 18. There will be reviews, interviews and giveaways along the way.   Continue reading

Pride & Prejudice: A BabyLit Board Book (Little Miss Austen) Blog Tour with Jennifer Adams

Pride & Prejudice: BabyLit Boad Book, by Jennifer Adams (2011)Please join us today in welcoming author Jennifer Adams for the official launch of her book blog tour of Pride & Prejudice: A BabyLit Board Book (Little Miss Austen), a new children’s board book inspired by Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice that is releasing today by Gibbs Smith Publisher.

Hi Laurel Ann. Thanks for asking me to blog about my new book, Pride & Prejudice: A BabyLit Board Book.  The idea for doing a baby book on the classics came one day when I was talking to my editor, Suzanne Taylor, creative director for Gibbs Smith, Publisher. We were talking about mash-ups and different books and the funky things people do with the classics. Suzanne and I are both in the book industry and always looking for new, clever ideas. She knows I love the classics, and Jane Austen in particular, and the idea for Little Miss Austen just struck her, she says, “like lightning.”

I wrote many different versions of the manuscript before we settled on making this a counting primer. It is a lot more difficult than one might think to take the beloved novel and condense it into a mere twenty words! You’ve got to get the tone and flavor of the book, capture its essence, but also make it for babies and toddlers, which is a completely different audience of course. It looks deceptively simple when you see the finished book, but creating it is actually quite a complex project.

People have had strong opinions about this book and the BabyLit series, both adamantly for and against it. We’ve had complaints that you can’t possibly have Romeo and Juliet as a baby book, because it is so serious and ends badly. We ended our book with “parting is such sweet sorrow” and ten little bird “couples” kissing each other goodnight. A perfect ending for giving your baby ten kisses when you’re tucking her into bed! With Pride and Prejudice, one of our sales reps said that we should say “two men” not “two rich gentlemen” because gentlemen is a multisyllabic word and not appropriate for babies. But if you don’t say “rich gentlemen” you are losing everything about it that is Austen! One thing that came together really nicely with these books is that we were passionate about them and followed our vision. We didn’t let them get changed by committee or dumbed down. And the overwhelmingly positive response and sales indicate we did the right thing. Continue reading