A Christmas Party: A Seasonal Murder Mystery, by Georgette Heyer — A Review

From the desk of Sophia Rose:

A “Holiday Whodunnit” during a locked door English country house party is always a delicious prospect for me. I eagerly cracked open, A Christmas Party, by the renowned Georgette Heyer. Famous for her Regency romances and historical fiction, she also wrote several contemporary murder mysteries set in the 1930’s to the 1950’s, the golden age of detective fiction. I soon settled in for some enjoyment.

A Colorful Assortment of Guests Continue reading “A Christmas Party: A Seasonal Murder Mystery, by Georgette Heyer — A Review”

A Bright Young Thing: A Novel, by Brianne Moore — A Review  

From the desk of Katie Patchell:

I have a question for you, fellow bibliophiles: Have you read P.G. Wodehouse’s Jeeves series? Written between 1915 and 1974, this series of short stories and novels is a sometimes biting (yet always fun) satire of Britain’s posh upper class. Starring wealthy and hapless Bertie Wooster and his much-put-upon butler, Jeeves, these stories dazzle with Wodehouse’s charming turn of phrase and list of characters with bizarre surnames. There’s a brilliant adaptation as well, starring Hugh Laurie and Stephen Fry, that further Continue reading “A Bright Young Thing: A Novel, by Brianne Moore — A Review  “

In Royal Service to the Queen: A Novel of the Queen’s Governess, by Tessa Arlen — A Review

From the desk of Laurel Ann Nattress: 

There is something about royalty that is so fascinating to me. What would it be like to be born into a world of privilege and power? How do they live? Who are their friends? What are their secrets?

The British royal family is my favorite, so I jumped at the chance to read In Royal Service to the Queen, by Tessa Arlen. Based on actual events and real people, the story is told from the perspective of governess Marion Crawford. Her charges were the royal Princesses Elizabeth and Margaret Rose Windsor. What she Continue reading “In Royal Service to the Queen: A Novel of the Queen’s Governess, by Tessa Arlen — A Review”

The Mitford Scandal: A Mitford Murders Mystery (Book 3), by Jessica Fellowes — A Review

The Mitford Scandal by Jessica Fellowes 2020From the desk of Debbie Brown: 

From 1928 to 1932, the British middle and upper class still experienced a bright time. The Roaring Twenties are dimming, yet the fun and frolic continue for those “Bright Young Things” who still have plenty of money. “They drink too much and they’re careless. They’re rich and young and they believe themselves to be invincible.” The descent into decadence plays a major role in The Mitford Scandal, a complex mystery, by Jessica Fellowes.

Foremost among them, Diana Mitford (an actual British socialite of the era) is presented as the embodiment of Daisy Buchanan, the heroine of F. Scott Fitzgerald’s magnum opus The Great Gatsby.  She Continue reading “The Mitford Scandal: A Mitford Murders Mystery (Book 3), by Jessica Fellowes — A Review”

A Preview of Downton Abbey: The Official Film Companion, by Emma Marriott, with a Foreword by Julian Fellowes

Downton Abbey: The Official Film Companion (2019)Downtonites have been patiently awaiting the arrival of the Downton Abbey movie since its official announcement in the summer of 2018. The possibility of a feature film of the phenomenally popular British period drama television series had been rumored (and wished for) since the final episode of season six aired in the UK on Christmas day in 2015 on ITV and in the US on Masterpiece Classic PBS in March of 2016. We just cannot get enough of those posh upstairs Crawley’s and their devoted downstairs servants, can we? It took four long years to reach the big screen. Its premiere in the UK and the US this past September garnered major media attention and red-carpeted events.

My further hopes and wishes were granted with the publication of Downton Abbey: The Official Film Companion, a tie-in, over-sized, coffee table book featuring gorgeous full-color images from the Continue reading “A Preview of Downton Abbey: The Official Film Companion, by Emma Marriott, with a Foreword by Julian Fellowes”

Circles of Time: Book Two of the Greville Family Saga, by Philip Rock – A Review

Image of the book cover of Circles of Time, by Philip Rock © William Morrow Books 2013After re-discovering The Passing Bells – after a thirty-year estrangement – I was thrilled to learn there were two more books in the Greville Family Saga. Originally published between 1978 – 1986, this welcome reissue of the trilogy by William Morrow Books is just in time for fans of the popular television series Downton Abbey to plunge back into the era between the wars and cocoon themselves in history, drama, and romance.

Set in England during 1921 – 1923, Circles of Time opens two years after the end of the Great War and the signing of the Treaty of Versailles by the German and the Allied Powers. The Greville family of Abingdon Pryory, like so many in Britain (and the world), have suffered five years of a devastating loss during the war and are attempting to rebound. How each of the characters deals with their pain and the future is what compels this story forward and captivates our hearts. Continue reading “Circles of Time: Book Two of the Greville Family Saga, by Philip Rock – A Review”

Website Built with WordPress.com.

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: