Giveaway Winners Announced for A Weekend with Mr. Darcy

A Weekend with Mr. Darcy, by Victoria Connelly (2011)34 of you left comments qualifying you for a chance to win one of three copies of A Weekend with Mr. Darcy, by Victoria Connelly. The winners drawn at random are:

  • Shelly who left a comment on 05 July 2011
  • Nancy Kelley who left a comment on 06 July 2011
  • Meg who left a comment on 07 July 2011

Congratulations ladies! To claim your prize, please contact me with your full name and address by July 20th, 2011. Shipment is to US and Canadian addresses only.

Thanks to all who left comments, and to author Victoria Connelly for her captivating blog on her travels in Jane Austen country for inspiration for her new novel!

© 2007 – 2011 Laurel Ann Nattress, Austenprose

A Weekend with Mr. Darcy, by Victoria Connelly – A Review

A Weekend with Mr. Darcy, by Victoria Connelly (2011)I am amazed at how many Austenesque novels continue to have “Mr. Darcy” worked into the title. Recently there has been: A Wife for Mr. Darcy, by Mary Lydon Simonsen, The Trouble with Mr. Darcy, by Sharon Lathan, The Truth about Mr. Darcy, by Susan Adriani, Mr. Darcy and the Secret of Becoming a Gentleman, by Maria Hamilton, Only Mr. Darcy Will Do, by Kara Louise, What Would Mr. Darcy Do?, by Abigail Reynolds and ironically Mr. Darcy Goes Overboard, by Belinda Roberts – and that is only in the last four months!!! Gentle readers, have we indeed gone overboard over Mr. Darcy? *shudder* Can there ever be too much Mr. Darcy?

As I opened A Weekend with Mr. Darcy, yet another new novel featuring Jane Austen’s romantic icon of Nonpareil in its title, it was difficult not to feel a rush of astonishment. What could Victoria Connelly possibly offer that has not already been said several times in historical, contemporary or paranormal versions? The back blurb looked promising: “Surrounded by appalling exes and fawning students, the only think keeping professor Katherine Roberts sane is Jane Austen, and her secret love for racy Regency romance novels. She thinks the Jane Austen Addicts weekend will be the perfect getaway. Maybe she’ll even meet her own personal Mr. Darcy… Breezy and beautifully witty, internationally bestselling author Victoria Connelly’s charming modern love story will appeal to all Jane Austen fanatics… and anyone who loves a good romance.” OK. So I’m an admitted Jane Austen fanatic and also love a good romance… this was a good start.

Set in contemporary England, we are introduced to the two main characters, singletons Katherine Roberts, a young and beautiful Oxford professor, and Robyn Love, a romantic idealist North Yorkshire receptionist. They are both bound for an idyllic Jane Austen weekend retreat at Purley Hall in the countryside of Hampshire, not far from Janeite Mecca – Steventon, where she was born and raised, and Chawton Cottage, where she wrote many of her novels. Also secretly headed to the retreat is famous Regency romance novelist Lorna Warwick who has been privately corresponding with Katherine for months, building a strong friendship but remaining an enigma to her. Even though she is an international bestselling author, she has never given a personal interview, nor allowed pictures to be published of herself. Lorna is captivated by Katherine and arrives at the retreat incognito – as Warwick Lawton. (Spoiler) Yes, Lorna Warwick is a man.

Both ladies have their complicated romantic past following them to the retreat. Katherine can’t seem to connect with the right man and prefers to fall in love with Jane Austen’s fictional world of Mr. Darcy, Captain Wentworth and Henry Tilney, easily finding solace in her obsession of heroes because there are so few real ones. Robyn on the other hand is a pure romantic. “Life for her was never as good as it was in fiction.” She is in a longstanding (but unfulfilling) relationship with Jason Collins. Unfortunately she does not know why she stays with Jace. They have nothing in common and the thought of being Mrs. Collins (the same last name as Jane Austen’s odious Reverend Collins in Pride and Prejudice) is unbearable. When he insists upon tagging along on her Jane Austen weekend, staying in a nearby Inn, she is both annoyed and suspicious.

The perfect summer fantasy Austenesque novel, A Weekend with Mr. Darcy supplies all the elements on this scrutinizing Janeite’s checklist: stunning early eighteenth-century country manor house, cast of colorful & humorous secondary characters, emotional roadblocks and misunderstandings, and two heroines in need of some personal growth before they can fall in love. Connelly’s enthusiastic knowledge of Jane Austen is solid and her writing style is fresh and funny.

Will A Weekend with Mr. Darcy get lost in the sea of “Mr. Darcy” inspired novels flooding the market? Nope. It is the leader of the pack! Brava Ms. Connelly! Since this is the first in a trilogy, we are all anticipation from this very talented author.

5 out of 5 Regency Stars

A Weekend with Mr. Darcy, by Victoria Connelly
Sourcebooks (2011)
Trade paperback (352) pages
ISBN: 978-1402251320

© 2007 – 2011 Laurel Ann Nattress, Austenprose

A Weekend with Mr. Darcy Blog Tour with Author Victoria Connelly

A Weekend with Mr. Darcy, by Victoria Connelly (2011)Please join us today in welcoming Austenesque author Victoria Connelly for the official launch of her book blog tour of A Weekend with Mr. Darcy a new Pride and Prejudice-inspired contemporary novel that was released on July 1, 2011 by Sourcebooks.

Inspiration for my books can come from anywhere.  It always amazes me what can get the imagination going.  My first book published in the UK, Molly’s Millions, was inspired by junk mail – a very unlikely beginning for a romantic comedy!

But it was when I was visiting Chawton in Hampshire that I seriously began thinking about writing about Jane Austen fans.  I’d visited Lyme Regis – the gorgeous setting for Persuasion, and Bath which was also used in Persuasion as well as Northanger Abbey.  I kept thinking about these three very different and beautiful settings and soon came up with the idea for a trilogy about Jane Austen addicts – each book set in a different Austen location.

The first book, A Weekend with Mr. Darcy, is set in Hampshire at a Jane Austen conference and I knew I wanted a grand Georgian manor house to have the starring role.  I’d pictured Newby Hall in North Yorkshire as my ideal house.  It had starred as Mansfield Park in the recent TV adaptation, but Yorkshire was a bit too far away for a research trip and so started an Internet search and discovered a gorgeous Georgian manor called Ardington House in the depths of the Oxfordshire countryside.  It was the perfect Purley Hall for my book with is sweep of driveway, its great cedar tree, and its pretty gardens leading down to the river.

Visiting locations for a book is a pleasure and a privilege.  Not only is it nice to get away from the desk once in a while but it’s vital if you want to make a place come alive and help readers really visualize it.

So, I went back to Chawton because I knew I was going to have a couple of chapters set there.  I also visited the nearby hamlet of Steventon and sat in the little church where Jane Austen would once have sat and where my own heroine, Robyn, sits, contemplating heroes.

I also visited Winchester.  I wanted to end the book at Jane Austen’s resting place and managed to visit it on the very day when the scene is set – Jane Austen’s birthday on the 16th December.  The Christmas market was in full swing and there were ice-skaters in front of the cathedral and, inside, there was a giant Christmas tree covered in simple white lights.  I sat next to Jane Austen’s grave and quietly thought of the scene I wanted to set there.  It was a magical moment.

The second book in my Austen addicts trilogy is called Dreaming of Mr. Darcy (The Perfect Hero in the UK) and is set in Lyme Regis.  We were lucky enough to stay in Lyme for two separate weeks whilst I was writing the book – choosing an apartment in the heart of the town with the most incredible view of the Cobb.  I wanted to write as much of the book as possible in situ and spent a freezing afternoon on the beach at Charmouth where my heroine and hero, Kay and Adam, go fossil hunting.  My hands were so cold that I could barely hold my pen and yet I wrote a good amount for the scene I had in mind.  I also walked the length and breadth of Lyme Regis, really getting to know the place which is just as well because I’d written a scene in which my heroine looks out of her bed and breakfast on Marine Parade and the hero spots her from the Cobb and waves.  I quickly realized that he’d never ever see her from that distance and so revised my idea for the scene.

The third book in the series, Mr. Darcy Forever, is set during the Jane Austen Festival in Bath and I had the good fortune to spend a long weekend there – but more about that another time.

I feel very fortunate in my chosen profession.  Not only do I get to spend my days creating stories but I get to visit some truly inspiring and beautiful places.  Now, I really must think about setting a novel in the Seychelles one day …

Author Victoria Connelly (2011)About the author:

Victoria Connelly’s first novel was promoted in Germany to celebrate World Book Day and was adapted into a TV movie. Her second novel was published as a lead title in the UK and chosen as a “hot pick” in Closer magazine. Her new trilogy is her first foray into Jane Austen related fiction. Connelly lives in London with her artist husband, Springer spaniel and ex-battery chickens. Visit Victoria at her blog, on Facebook and as @VictoriaDarcy on Twitter.

Giveaway of  A Weekend with Mr. Darcy

Enter a chance to win one of three copies of A Weekend with Mr. Darcy by leaving a comment answering what intrigues you most about reading a Pride and Prejudice-inspired contemporary novel or what characters you would like to see Victoria write about next, by midnight PT, Wednesday, July 13, 2011. Winners to be announced on Thursday, July 14, 2011. Shipment to US and Canadian addresses only. Good luck!

A Weekend with Mr. Darcy, by Victoria Connelly
Sourcebooks (2011)
Trade paperback (352) pages
ISBN: 978-1402251320

2007 – 2011 Victoria Connelly, Austenprose

Austen Book Sleuth: New Books in the Queue for September 2010

Autumn is here — and September is my favorite month of the year in book publishing.  There is always so much to choose from and this year does not disappoint.  The Jane Austen book sleuth is happy to inform Janeites of the many, many Austen inspired books heading our way this month, so keep your eyes open for these new titles.  Vampires seem to be dominating the field, with mysteries and Mr. Darcy stories not far behind.  Enjoy!

Fiction (prequels, sequels, retellings, variations, or Regency inspired)

Jane and the Madness of Lord Byron: Being A Jane Austen Mystery, by Stephanie Barron

It’s been four long years since Jane and the Baroque of Frailty, the last Jane Austen mystery from Stephanie Barron first graced my bookshelf.  That is eternity for this Janeite who is as passionate (well almost) about mysteries as her Jane Austen.  The combination of these two mighty forces of fiction is about as good as it gets for me in pleasure reading.  This is the tenth book in Barron’s critically acclaimed series of Jane Austen as a genteel Regency-era sleuth, gumshoeing it with Lords, Ladies and murderers.  The story set in 1813 throws Jane into a murder investigation in Brighton (oh, won’t Kitty & Lydia Bennet be thrilled) involving that infamous mad, bad and dangerous to know poet of the Regency-era, Lord Byron. *swoon* (publisher’s description)  The restorative power of the ocean brings Jane Austen and her beloved brother Henry, to Brighton after Henry’s wife is lost to a long illness.  But the crowded, glittering resort is far from peaceful, especially when the lifeless body of a beautiful young society miss is discovered in the bedchamber of none other than George Gordon—otherwise known as Lord Byron.  As a poet and a seducer of women, Byron has carved out a shocking reputation for himself—but no one would ever accuse him of being capable of murder.  Now it falls to Jane to pursue this puzzling investigation and discover just how “mad, bad, and dangerous to know” Byron truly is.  And she must do so without falling victim to the charming versifier’s legendary charisma, lest she, too, become a cautionary example for the ages.  Bantam, trade paperback, ISBN: 978-0553386707

The Phantom of Pemberley: A Pride and Prejudice Murder Mystery, by Regina Jeffers

Another Austen inspired murder mystery to enchant us arrives from author Regina Jeffers.  She has previously written retellings and continuations of heroes: enigmatic Mr. Darcy and stalwart Captain Wentworth.  Now she takes an entirely new direction with a murder mystery and continues Pride and Prejudice with a twist. (publishers description) Happily married for over a year and more in love than ever, Darcy and Elizabeth can’t imagine anything interrupting their bliss-filled days.  Then an intense snowstorm strands a group of travelers at Pemberley, and terrifying accidents and mysterious deaths begin to plague the manor.  Everyone seems convinced that it is the work of a phan-tom–a Shadow Man who is haunting the Darcy family’s grand estate.  Darcy and Elizabeth believe the truth is much more menacing and that someone is trying to murder them.  But Pemberley is filled with family guests as well as the unexpected travelers — any one of whom could be the culprit — so unraveling the mystery of the murderer’s identity forces the newlyweds to trust each other’s strengths and work together.  Written in the style of the era and including Austen’s romantic playfulness and sardonic humor, this suspense-packed sequel to Pride and Prejudice recasts Darcy and Elizabeth as a husband-and-wife detective team who must solve the mystery at Pemberley and catch the murderer–before it’s too late. Ulysses Press, trade paperback, ISBN: 978-1569758458

Darcy’s Voyage: A tale of uncharted love on the open seas, by Kara Louise

This Pride and Prejudice variation places Mr. Darcy on board a ship (well, it did wonders for Captain Wentworth’s career) and traveling to America with socially inferior Elizabeth Bennet relegated to steerage.  The same misconceptions, misunderstandings and social machinations abound for the spirited Miss Bennet and the haughty Mr. Darcy, except they need to take their daily dose of Dramamine to get through it.  (publisher’s description)  In this enchanting and highly original retelling of Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice, Elizabeth Bennet sets out for the new world aboard the grand ship Pemberley’s Promise.  She’s prepared for an uneventful voyage until a chance encounter with the handsome, taciturn Mr. Darcy turns her world upside down.  When Elizabeth falls ill, Darcy throws convention overboard in a plan that will bind them to each other more deeply than he ever could have imagined.  But the perils of their ocean voyage pale in comparison to the harsh reality of society’s rules that threaten their chance at happiness.  When they return to the lavish halls of England, will their love survive?  Sourcebooks Landmark, trade paperback, ISBN: 978-1402241024

Mr. Darcy’s Little Sister, by C. Allyn Pierson

Originally self-published in 2008 as And This Our Life: Chronicles of the Darcy Family: Book 1, this Pride and Prejudice continuation is ‘coming out’ again after a make-over and a new frock graces the elegant lady on the cover.  One assumes the beautiful debutant is Georgiana Darcy since she is Mr. Darcy’s little sister and the books heroine.  I really enjoyed this novel in its first inception.  Pierson has an excellent grasp of literature, Regency history and social customs and a reverence for Austen’s characters that just needed a good editor and some gilding to make it shine. (publisher’s description) Georgiana Darcy grows up and goes in pursuit of happiness and true love, much to her big brother’s consternation.  A whole new side of Mr. Darcy…He’s the best big brother, generous to a fault.  Protective, never teases. But over his dead body is any rogue or fortune hunter going to get near his little sister! (Unfortunately, any gentleman who wants to court Georgiana is going to have the same problem…)  So how’s a girl ever going to meet the gentleman of her dreams?  Sourcebooks Landmark, trade paperback, ISBN: 978-1402240386

I Was Jane Austen’s Best Friend, by Cora Harrison

I am pleased to see another young adult novel inspired by Jane Austen’s life being released.  It is a great way to introduce a younger reader to Austen and her times with a historical bio-fic.  This is Irish author Cora Harrison’s first Austenesque novel, but she has written a plethora of children’s mysteries, which seems very apt for what we know of Jane Austen’s life.  (publisher’s description)  When shy Jenny Cooper goes to stay with her cousin Jane Austen, she knows nothing of the world of beautiful dresses, dances, secrets, gossip, and romance that Jane inhabits.  At fifteen, Jane is already a sharp observer of the customs of courtship.  So when Jenny falls utterly in love with Captain Thomas Williams, who better than Jane to help her win the heart of this dashing man?  But is that even possible?  After all, Jenny’s been harboring a most desperate secret.  Should it become known, it would bring scandal not only to her, but also to the wonderful Austen family.  What’s a poor orphan girl to do?  In this delicious dance between truth and fiction, Cora Harrison has crafted Jenny’s secret diary by reading everything Jane Austen wrote as a child and an adult, and by researching biographies, critical studies, and family letters.  Jenny’s diary makes the past spring vividly to life and provides insight into the entire Austen family—especially the beloved Jane. Delacorte Books for Young Readers, Hardcover, ISBN: 978-0385739405

Bespelling Jane Austen: Almost Persuaded\Northanger Castle\Blood and Prejudice\Little to Hex Her, by Mary Balogh, Colleen Gleason, Susan Krinard & Janet Mullany

More vampire infused Austen retellings from a quartet of popular romance writers who each take one of Austen’s classic novels and reimagine it from a paranormal perspective.  Too bad they didn’t make it six stories, to include all of Austen’s major novels.  We will just have to close our eyes and think of Willoughby and Crawford as vampires instead.  Actually, that is not too far of a stretch.  Next up we are likely to see a Jane Austen’s gentleman’s vampire club! ;-) (publisher’s description)

Almost Persuaded:  In this Regency tale of Robert and Jane, New York Times bestselling author Mary Balogh brings together former lovers who have seen beyond the veil of forgetfulness to their past mistakes, and are determined to be together in this life, and forever.

Northanger Castle:  Carloine’s obsession with Gothic novels winds up being good training for a lifetime of destroying the undead with her newfound beau, in this Regency by Colleen Gleason

Blood and Prejudice:  Set in the business world of contemporary New York City, Liz Bennet joins Mr. Darcy in his hunt for a vampire cure in New York Times bestselling suthor Susan Krinard’s version of the classic story.

Little To Hex Her:  Present-day Washington, D.C., is full of curious creatures in  Janet Mullany’s story, wherein Emma is a witch with with a wizard boyfriend and a paranormal dating service to run. HQN Books; Original edition, trade paperback, ISBN: 978-0373775019

Jane and the Damned, by Janet Mullany

Author Janet Mullany is really on an Austen paranormal role as two novels that she is involved with are released on the same day!  She is one of four author’s contributing a novella to Bespelling Jane Austen, and she wrote Jane and the Damned all on her lonesome.  Busy lady.  I always enjoy Janet’s wicked wit and bounding energy, so I am all anticipation of both of her paranormal offerings.  Just the tag line alone will confirm her sense of humor.  (publisher’s description)  Jane Austen – Novelist . . . gentlewoman . . . Damned, Fanged, and Dangerous to know.  Aspiring writer Jane Austen knows that respectable young ladies like herself are supposed to shun the Damned—the beautiful, fashionable, exquisitely seductive vampires who are all the rage in Georgian England in 1797.  So when an innocent (she believes) flirtation results in her being turned—by an absolute cad of a bloodsucker—she acquiesces to her family’s wishes and departs for Bath to take the waters, the only known cure.  But what she encounters there is completely unexpected: perilous jealousies and further betrayals, a new friendship and a possible love.  Yet all that must be put aside when the warring French invade unsuspecting Bath—and the streets run red with good English blood. Suddenly only the staunchly British Damned can defend the nation they love . . . with Jane Austen leading the charge at the battle’s forefront.  Avon, trade paperback, ISBN: 978-0061958304

A Weekend with Mr. Darcy, by Victoria Connelly

The first novel in Connelly’s trilogy of Austen inspired contempories releases in the UK on September 16th.  Us Yanks will have to wait until Spring 2011 before it storms our shores.  If you are tempted like me, and can’t wait, you can buy it on Amazon.uk!  (pleeeze don’t tell my employer B&N that I said that)  The stories look light, bright and sparkly.  (publisher’s description)  Katherine Roberts is fed up with men.  As a lecturer specialising in the works of Jane Austen, she knows that the ideal man only exists within the pages of Pride & Prejudice and that in real life there is no such thing.  Determined to go it alone, she finds all the comfort she needs reading her guilty pleasure – regency romances from the pen of Lorna Warwick – with whom she has now struck up an intimate correspondence.  Austen fanatic, Robyn Love, is blessed with a name full of romance, but her love life is far from perfect. Stuck in a rut with a bonehead boyfriend, Jace, and a job she can do with her eyes shut – her life has hit a dead end. Robyn would love to escape from it all but wouldn’t know where to start.  They both decide to attend the annual Jane Austen Conference at sumptuous Purley Hall, overseen by the actress and national treasure, Dame Pamela Harcourt.  Robyn is hoping to escape from Jace for the weekend and indulge in her passion for all things Austen.  Katherine is hoping that Lorna Warwick will be in attendance and is desperate to meet her new best friend in the flesh.  But nothing goes according to plan and Robyn is aghast when Jace insists on accompanying her, whilst Katherine is disappointed to learn that Lorna won’t be coming.  However, an Austen weekend wouldn’t be the same without a little intrigue, and Robyn and Katherine are about to get much more than they bargained for.  Because where Jane Austen is concerned, romance is never very far away…  Avon, trade paperback, ISBN: 978-1847562258

Austen’s Oeuvre

Pride and Prejudice (Oxford Children’s Classics), by Jane Austen

This is a complete and unabridged text of Austen’s classic beautifully bound with cover art to appeal to a young reader.  This lovely gift-quality edition comes with a book plate page where they can proudly display their name.  I envy them their first reading experience, though the average 9 year old will need some help with the language.  (publisher’s description)  When Elizabeth Bennet first meets Mr. Darcy she finds him to be most arrogant.  He, in turn, is determined not to be impressed by Elizabeth’s beauty and wit.  As events unfold their paths cross with more and more frequency, and their disdain for each other grows.  Can they ever overcome their prejudices and realize that first impressions are not always reliable?  If you love a good story, then look no further.  Oxford Children’s Classics bring together the most unforgettable stories ever told.  They’re books to treasure and return to again and again.  Oxford University Press, USA, Hardcover, ISBN: 978-0192789860, reading level: Ages 9-12

Nonfiction

Jane Austen on Love and Romance, by Constance Moore

This charming quote book is packed full of Austen’s wittiest and most enlightening quotes from her novels and letters to advize the lovelorn, unrequited and amorously deprived.  The vintage illustrations and beautiful design of this little jewel will make it great for gift-giving. Read with a full bottle of wine and you’ll totally forget that rapacious roué what’s his name.  (publisher’s description)   “There are certainly not so many men of large fortune in the world, as there are pretty women to deserve them”. “How little of permanent happiness could belong to a couple who were only brought together because their passions were stronger than their virtue”.  Many of us have come across an aloof Mr. Darcy or have fallen under the spell of a rakish Mr. Wickham along the rocky path to true love, and it is these oh-so-true-to-life characters and her witty, gossipy, yet heartfelt observations that make Jane Austen’s novels as pertinent today as when they were first written over two hundred years ago.  This collection of quotations, including extracts from letters to family and friends, accompanied by the illustrations of High Thomson, C. E. Brock and H. M. Brock, will soothe those nerves and provide clarity and cultured explanations when it comes to matters of the heart.  If you want to make like Elizabeth Bennet and live happily ever after with a man who owns half of Derbyshire, then arm yourself with this Austentatious guide to flirting and courtship.  Summersdale Publishers, trade paperback, ISBN: 978-1849531054

Jane Austen and Children, by David Selwyn

There has been a rumor circulated for years that Jane Austen did not like children because she did not show them in a positive light in most of her stories. Ha! She loved telling fairy tales to her nieces and nephews so I doubt very much that she disliked children personally.  This new nonfiction book by Jane Austen Society Chairman and Journal editor David Selwyn explores everything you could ever imagine about Jane Austen’s perspective on children and the cultural context of a Regency and Georgian child.  (publisher’s description)  This title explores the surprisingly important part that children play in the novels of Jane Austen and the contribution they make to understanding her adult characters.  Jane Austen is not usually associated with children – especially since she had none of her own.  But there are in fact more children in her novels than one might at first think.  She herself was from a sizeable family, with numerous nephews and nieces.  She was, by all accounts, good with children and popular with them.  It was therefore natural for her to include them in her novels, even if sometimes offstage.  This book, by one of the world’s leading authorities on Austen, looks at both the real and the literary children in her life – children seen and unseen (and dead); children as models of behaviour, good and bad; as objects of affection, amusement, usefulness, pity, regret, jealousy, resentment; children in the way; children as excuses; and, children as heirs.  In the process, it casts fascinating light on a hitherto largely ignored aspect of her work and the age in which she lived.  Continuum, hardcover, ISBN: 978-1847250414

Until next month, happy reading!

Laurel Ann

Austen Tattler: News and Gossip on the Net: Issue No 9

“All that she wants is gossip, and she only likes me now because I supply it.” Marianne Dashwood, Sense and Sensibility, Chapter 31

April 12th – 18th, 2010

Hot News of the Week:

New author Jenni James of Northanger Alibi, a modern retelling of Northanger Abbey influenced by Twilight, lands the Austenesque book publicity coup of the decade! Wow. This might be a first for Austen on TV.

Noteworthy:

Author and Janeite Catherine Delors features Jane Austen’s juvenilia The History of England and directs us to the original manuscript viewable online at The British Museum website.

The beautiful new hardback editions of Penguin Classics are featured in a Elle Decor article including Jane Austen’s Emma, Sense and Sensibility and Pride and Prejudice designed by Coralie Bickford-Smith.

Interview of Monica Fairview, author of The Darcy Cousins at Austenprose. Swag contest ends 23 April 2010.

Author Jane Odiwe of Austen Sequels Blog features a preview of the new debut novel First Impressions, by Alexa Adams.

Regency Mourning Fashions in England by Vic Sanborn of Jane Austen’s World is featured in the Suite 101.com online repository of insightful writers and informed readers.

Catherine Morland and Isabella Thorpe’s favorite Gothic novel The Mysteries of Udolpho that they read together in Austen’s novel Northanger Abbey is highlighted on Jane Greensmith’s blog Reading, Writing, Playing in a great post on The Gothic Novel.

Shameless self promotion here, but Maria Grazia has interviewed moi for her lovely blog Fly High. Leave a comment and enter a chance to win your choice of selected Austenesque books. Ends 25 April, 2010.

Another interview of note is of Vera Nazarian, author of Mansfield Park and Mummies at Jane Austen’s World.

Vote for your favorite Pride and Prejudice book cover from my top ten favorites. As of today, there is a dead tie between White’s Publishings lovely new release showing a graphic rep of Regency dancers from the waist down and the classic cover design by Hugh Thomson for the 1894 peacock edition of P&P.

Deb at Jane Austen in Vermont blog posts info on Soethby’s The English Country House auction results. Oh my. Beautiful Regency-era items, but the prices Lousia!

It is a truth universally acknowledged that Jane invented baseball since she mentioned it in her novel Northanger Abbey. Doubtful? Read further proof in the third installment of posts by Mags at AustenBlog.

Entertainment:

British actor Elliot Cowan (Mr. Darcy in Lost in Austen 2009) opens in The Scottish Play in London next week. Read about the lore and superstition behind the Shakespeare play that we dare not mention.

The Jane Austen Story opened at Winchester Cathedral on 10 April, 2010. Read more about this new exhibit spotlighting Jane Austen’s burial place and life in Hampshire that will run until 20 September 2010.

The Los Angeles Times Book Festival has always been a lively affair and this year one of the guest speakers is author/editor Susannah Carson of the Austen anthology A Truth Universally Acknowledged that we reviewed and enjoyed. Jane Austen Today has a featured article on the the LA  festival which makes me homesick for outdoor book fairs that I frequented while I lived in California. *sigh*

New Austenesque Book Announcements:

A Weekend with Mr. Darcy, by Victoria Connelly — 16 Sep 2010

Book Reviews:

Until next week, happy Jane sighting.

Laurel Ann

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