The Time Traveler’s Guide to Regency Britain: A Handbook for Visitors to 1789–1830, by Ian Mortimer — A Review

From the desk of Tracy Hickman: 

Austenesque fiction like The Jane Austen Project and the BBC TV series Lost in Austen have entertained Janeites with fantastic stories about journeying back in time to Austen’s Regency Britain. While I cannot imagine being tempted myself, unless guaranteed a round-trip ticket, the idea of a virtual visit to Austen’s Britain with an experienced tour guide who is a Fellow of the Royal Historical Society, and a writer of Continue reading “The Time Traveler’s Guide to Regency Britain: A Handbook for Visitors to 1789–1830, by Ian Mortimer — A Review”

An Exclusive Interview with Tessa Arlen, Author of A Dress of Violet Taffeta

From the desk of Laurel Ann Nattress: 

Happy Friday, dear readers. Spring is finally here in my neck of the woods. It is time of renewal, flowers, and new books!

I am pleased to have a special guest with us today. Author Tessa Arlen has a new historical fiction novel arriving in July that immediately caught my eye, A Dress of Violet Taffeta. Arlen is a favorite author of mine. I have enjoyed her Lady Montfort mystery series, and recently adored her In Royal Service to the Queen. Continue reading “An Exclusive Interview with Tessa Arlen, Author of A Dress of Violet Taffeta”

Lily of the Valley: The Gents (Book 2), by Sarah M. Eden — A Review

From the desk of Katie Jackson:

Historical romance readers, rejoice! Sarah M. Eden has graciously reunited us with those best friends who are like brothers in Book 2 of her Georgian-era The Gents series, Lily of the Valley.

Grumpy Uncle

The Gents were something of a miracle in his life. They’d saved him from a lifetime of loneliness and seen him through times of sorrow. They were like brothers to him. And yet, he often wished them to Hades.” (Loc 204)

Continue reading “Lily of the Valley: The Gents (Book 2), by Sarah M. Eden — A Review”

10 Facts You May Not Know About Jane Austen and Her Novels

Jane Austen Bookstack, by Bea Harvie

From the desk of Laurel Ann Nattress:

English novelist Jane Austen was born on December 16, 1775, in Steventon, Hampshire, the seventh of eight children of Rev. George Austen and his wife Cassandra Austen, nee Leigh. Her six major novels concern the pursuit of security, and love, for women dependent upon marriage among the landed gentry in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth century England. Continue reading “10 Facts You May Not Know About Jane Austen and Her Novels”

When Blood Lies: A Sebastian St. Cyr Mystery (Book 17), by C.S. Harris — A Review

From the desk of Sophia Rose:

One of the most vibrant, yet gritty historical mystery series on the market today, the Sebastian St. Cyr series by C.S. Harris captivates and meets readers intellectually and emotionally with remarkable tales that are much more than a clever mystery set in the Regency period. When Blood Lies, the 17th book in the series, is one of my most anticipated reads this year and makes my top favorites lists. Continue reading “When Blood Lies: A Sebastian St. Cyr Mystery (Book 17), by C.S. Harris — A Review”

An Impossible Impostor: A Veronica Speedwell Mystery (Book 7), by Deanna Raybourn — A Review

From the desk of Sophia Rose:

A winning combo occurred when talented authoress, Deanna Raybourn, paired Veronica, and Stoker, two of the most eccentric individuals of the Victorian Age. Sparks fly with their scintillating dialogue and spirits draw in their readers and make it an irksome delight to have to wait for each new release. The Impossible Impostor is their next story in the Veronica Speedwell series and I eagerly consumed it. Continue reading “An Impossible Impostor: A Veronica Speedwell Mystery (Book 7), by Deanna Raybourn — A Review”

Isabel: A Regency Romance (Families of Dorset Book 2), by Martha Keyes — A Review    

From the desk of Katie Patchell:

First love or second love? Sometimes we (and our heroes and heroines) end up with our first loves–these are often the “salad days” stories of childhood and college sweethearts. But sometimes the field is won not by the person we or our heroes/heroines love first, but the person loved last. In Isabel, Martha Keyes’ second novel in her ‘Families of Dorset’ series, readers encounter a thoughtful, romantic take on the Continue reading “Isabel: A Regency Romance (Families of Dorset Book 2), by Martha Keyes — A Review    “

The Viscount Who Loved Me: Bridgerton (Book 2), by Julia Quinn — A Review

From the desk of Rachel McMillan:

Returning to The Viscount Who Loved Me I found myself in the pages of a romantic masterpiece. Here, the canvas of a London season showcases two hearts burdened by grief and anxiety only to find love amidst a cast of familiar characters beloved by readers the world over. Lord Anthony Bridgerton, eldest of the series’ eponymous family is, as ton gossip monger Lady Whistledown insists, a capital R rake. Continue reading “The Viscount Who Loved Me: Bridgerton (Book 2), by Julia Quinn — A Review”

The Mozart Code: A Novel, by Rachel McMillan — A Review

From the desk of Katie Jackson: 

When World War II ended and Europe was rebuilding, there was another war of ideologies simmering in the shadows, waiting for a chance to seize control. These ideologies and the influential men conspiring to achieve their glory are the targets of sophisticated spies in a suspenseful tale of espionage, The Mozart Code, by Rachel McMillan. Continue reading “The Mozart Code: A Novel, by Rachel McMillan — A Review”

For the Lady of Lowena: A Cornish Romance (Book Two), by Deborah M. Hathaway — A Review

From the desk of Katie Jackson:

Shakespeare once wrote, “O Fortune, Fortune! all men call thee fickle.” And it is the fickleness of friends, fame, and fortune that must be faced when they no longer prove faithful in the second book of the A Cornish Romance series, For the Lady of Lowena, by skilled storyteller Deborah M. Hathaway.

A Genuine Gentleman Continue reading “For the Lady of Lowena: A Cornish Romance (Book Two), by Deborah M. Hathaway — A Review”

The Valet’s Secret: Proper Romance Regency, by Josi S. Kilpack — A Review 

From the desk of Katie Patchell:   

Last year I had the immense good fortune to review Love and Lavender by Josi S. Kilpack. Trusting the logo of Shadow Mountain Publishing–one of my favorite Regency publishers–I cracked open its pages, not knowing what to expect…and then discovered that I was reading a work of art. For months I waited for news about Josi S. Kilpack’s next novel, and it’s finally arrived! Without further ado, let me introduce Continue reading “The Valet’s Secret: Proper Romance Regency, by Josi S. Kilpack — A Review “

Jane Austen’s Table: Recipes Inspired by the Works of Jane Austen, by Robert Tuesley Anderson — A Review

From the desk of Tracy Hickman:  

One of my favorite Austen quotes from her letters concerns food: “I shall eat ice and drink French wine and be above vulgar economy.” This was penned in anticipation of a visit to Godmersham, where her brother Edward provided luxuries beyond Jane’s regular fare. From the white soup that Mr. Bingley’s kitchen staff prepare for the ball at Netherfield, to the picnic at Boxhill in Emma, food sustains the Continue reading “Jane Austen’s Table: Recipes Inspired by the Works of Jane Austen, by Robert Tuesley Anderson — A Review”

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