Walking Jane Austen’s London: A Tour Guide for the Modern Reader, by Louise Allen – A Review

Walking Jane Austen's London, by Louise Allen (2013)From the desk of Katie Patchell:

Have you ever wanted to experience Jane Austen’s London? To see all the sights (comparing past and present) and to literally walk in Jane’s footsteps, all without being slowed down by an actual tour guide? If so, then Walking Jane Austen’s London: A Tour Guide for The Modern Reader is just for you!

Walking Jane Austen’s London includes eight highly informative walks that are between 1.75 and 2.5 miles. Each walk (or chapter) starts with a very useful box of information, which includes the starting location of your walk, the nearest tube station and bus stop, the length of your route, and the opening hours of any Regency or Georgian historical site that is on your way. Also included in each chapter is a well-marked map detailing your walk route, as well as the streets and other attractions close by. With a picture (sometimes two) on every one of the 109 pages, this provides an attractive and entertaining read no matter where you are.

These are some of the places seen in the following walks:

Walk 1—Sloane Street to Kensington Palace Gardens

  • The room of her brother’s home where Jane Austen did most of her letter-writing and proof reading in.
  • Kensington Gardens, where Elinor (from Sense and Sensibility) took a stroll–although the beauty would be somewhat marred by her companions, Mrs. Jennings and Lucy Steele!

Walk 2—Marylebone and Bond Street

  • Bond Street (present in many Regency novels), the parading ground of the dandies, beaux, and the Prince Regent.
  • Wimpole Street, where Maria Rushworth (from Mansfield Park) lived before running off with Henry Crawford.

Walk 3—Mayfair

  • The home of Jane’s publisher, John Murray, who was (in her opinion) “…a Rogue of course, but a civil one.”
  • The residence of the fashionable and well-dressed dandy, Beau Brummell.

Walk 4—Leicester Square to Green Park Continue reading