A Preview of The Thief of Lanwyn Manor: The Cornwall Novels Book 2, by Sarah E. Ladd

The Thief of Lanwyn Manor (The Cornwall Novels Book 2) by Sarah E. Ladd 2020Cornwall + Gothic = scintillating reading!

There has been a long tradition of Gothic novels set in Cornwall. The southern-most county of England has more miles of rocky coastline, windswept cliffs, mysterious manor houses, and menaced heroines than any other location in literary history.

Author Daphne du Maurier (1907–1989) is a major contributor to this genre with Jamaica Inn (1936), Rebecca (1938), and My Cousin Rachel (1951), adding greatly to the mysterious reputation emanating from Cornwall. Susan Howatch’s Penmarric, and Victoria Holt’s Bride of Pendorric, are also fabulous dark romances that send chills.

Today, I am happy to introduce you to Sarah E. Ladd. She joins an august ensemble of authors to this unique genre of romance with mysterious overtones in The Thief of Lanwyn Manor, her second novel of her Cornwall Books. Here is a description and an exclusive excerpt for your enjoyment.

BOOK DESCRIPTION:

In Regency England, an advantageous match could set up a lady for life. Julia knows Matthew Blake, copper mine owner, and very eligible bachelor is the gentleman she should set her eyes upon. But why can’t she steal her gaze away from his younger brother, Isaac?

Cornwall, England, 1818

Julia Twethewey needs a diversion to mend her broken heart, so when her cousin invites her to Lanwyn Manor, Julia eagerly accepts. The manor is located at the heart of Cornwall’s mining industry, and as a guest, Julia is swept into its intricate world. It’s not long, though, before she realizes something dark lurks within the home’s ancient halls.

As a respected mine owner’s younger son, Isaac Blake is determined to keep his late father’s legacy alive through the family business, despite his brother’s careless attitude. In order to save their livelihood—and that of the people around them—the brothers approach the master of Lanwyn Manor with plans to bolster the floundering local industry. Isaac can’t deny his attraction to the man’s charming niece, but his brother has made clear his intentions to court the lovely visitor. And Isaac knows his place.

When tragedy strikes, mysteries arise, and valuables go missing, Julia and Isaac find they are pulled together in a swirl of strange circumstances, but despite their best efforts to bow to social expectations, their hearts aren’t so keen to surrender.

EXCLUSIVE EXCERPT: Continue reading

The #Janeite Blog Tour of The Bride of Northanger Begins on October 28th

The Bride of Northanger: A Jane Austen Variation, by Diana Birchall (2019)Those of you who are fans of Austenprose know how much I enjoy Jane Austen’s lively, burlesque comedy, Northanger Abbey. In 2008 I hosted a month-long event here called, Go Gothic with Northanger Abbey, where we read the novel and explored its history, characters, locations, and legacy. I am a big #TeamTilney fan.

Sadly, there are not many Northanger Abbey-inspired novels in print. Margaret Sullivan, who is also a great admirer of Austen’s lesser-known work, wrote There Must Be Murder in 2010. There is also Henry Tilney’s Diary, by Amanda Grange, and Searching for Mr. Tilney, by Jane Odiwe, and a few others.

Imagine my delight when I discovered that Diana Birchall was publishing a Northanger Abbey continuation, The Bride of Northanger and that her new novel was going on a celebratory book release tour across the blogosphere, just in time for the Halloween reading season!

Here is information on the book, and the tour.

BOOK DESCRIPTION:  

A happier heroine than Catherine Morland does not exist in England, for she is about to marry her beloved, the handsome, witty Henry Tilney. The night before the wedding, Henry reluctantly tells Catherine and her horrified parents a secret he has dreaded to share – that there is a terrible curse on his family and their home, Northanger Abbey. Henry is a clergyman, educated and rational, and after her year’s engagement Catherine is no longer the silly young girl who delighted in reading “horrid novels”; she has improved in both reading and rationality. This sensible young couple cannot believe curses are real…until a murder at the Abbey triggers events as horrid and Gothic as Jane Austen ever parodied – events that shake the young Tilneys’ certainties, but never their love for each other…

EARLY PRAISE: Continue reading

The Quiet Gentleman, by Georgette Heyer – A Review

The Quiet Gentleman, by Georgette Heyer (2011) Guest review by Laura A. Wallace: 

“To own the truth,” replied Miss Morville candidly, “I can perceive nothing romantic in a headless spectre.  I should think it a very disagreeable sight, and if I did fancy I saw such a thing I should take one of Dr. James’s powders immediately!”

Thus Drusilla Morville sadly disappoints her more romantic-minded friend, Marianne Bolderwood, on the subject of potential hauntings in Stanyon Castle, where both young ladies are staying before a ball.  Miss Morville has been staying at Stanyon rather longer than Miss Bolderwood:  her parents are away, and the Dowager Countess of St. Erth, who has a kindness for her, invited her to stay with her while they are gone.

And so Miss Morville is present to witness the homecoming of the seventh Earl of St. Erth to take up his patrimony.  He had been estranged from his father from the unfortunate elopement of his mother when he was a small boy; on her death, the sixth Earl had married again and produced two more children.  But the elder son hardly ever visited his ancestral home, spending his school holidays with maternal relations, and later serving in the 7th Hussars at Waterloo— an event which happened shortly after his father’s death, and perhaps excused his failure to attend his obsequies, but he then chose to delay his return until the mourning year ended.

The other residents of Stanyon include the Honourable Martin Frant, half-brother to the seventh earl;  Theodore Frant, who serves as an estate agent and is the son of the sixth Earl’s reprobate younger brother;  and the Reverend Felix Clowne, the late Earl’s chaplain, who remains in that capacity for the Dowager Countess. Continue reading