For Elise, by Sarah M. Eden – A Review

For Elise by Sarah Eden 2014 x 200From the desk of Katie Patchell:

Captain Wentworth and Anne Elliot’s romance in Jane Austen’s Persuasion is one of the most captivating in classic literature. Opinion varies as to what it is that makes their romance so satisfying, but something almost all fans of Persuasion can agree with is the complete beauty that is found when a hero and heroine, after long separation and opposition, discover that the time apart has done nothing to lessen the strength of their affection. Sarah M. Eden follows this timeless pattern in her latest Regency romance, For Elise, but unlike in Persuasion, the hero and heroine do not face a father’s disapproval or society’s disappointment—they face a murderer.

It is the spring of 1815, and Miles Linwood, recently returned from the West Indies, cannot pass a day without being haunted by memories of his carefree childhood friend and neighbor, Elise. Four years previously a tragedy had shattered both of their lives, leaving them to cope as they always did: together. A few weeks later and with no explanation Elise left Miles’ estate, vanishing without a trace—until four years later, when Miles catches a glimpse of familiar brown curls and Elise’s peculiar blue eyes in a small town. Miles is overjoyed to discover his best friend, but Elise is drastically altered from who she used to be, and is now hostile and untrusting, particularly towards Miles. Continue reading

The Muse: A Pride and Prejudice Variation, by Jessica Evans – A Review

The Muse by Jessica Evans 2014 x 200From the desk of Lisa Galek:

When most people think of Jane Austen, they probably don’t think of ballet. I know I certainly didn’t. That was until I read The Muse. With her contemporary reimagining of Pride and Prejudice, Jessica Evans proves that the demanding and competitive world of a professional ballet company is exactly the place where you might find a modern Elizabeth Bennet and Mr. Darcy.

Elizabeth Bennet is a young dancer at the Ballet Theater of New York. While Elizabeth might not have her sister Jane’s perfect technique or ideal body, she still dreams of rising up the ranks to one day become a star. That’s why she’s thrilled when she finds out that she’s been cast in an upcoming ballet by former superstar dancer and legendary choreographer, William Darcy.

But, when Elizabeth finally meets Darcy, he’s not what she imagined at all. Sure, Darcy is immensely talented (and incredibly dreamy), but he’s also arrogant, abrasive, and dismissive in rehearsals. When Darcy asks Elizabeth for help as he choreographs, she grows to dislike him even more. What Elizabeth doesn’t realize is how much she’s inspiring Darcy as he creates. He’s finally found his muse. Continue reading

The Secret of Pembrooke Park Blog Tour

Secret of Pembrooke blog tour horizontal banner

Award winning historical romance author Julie Klassen tours the blogosphere February 16 through March 2, 2015 to share her latest release, The Secret of Pembrooke Park. 

Klassen’s eighth novel is a Gothic romance, a “gem for Regency and inspirational readers alike.” — Bookpage, introducing us to Miss Abigail Foster, a heroine in the making who travels to an ancestral manor where she discovers a past tainted by family secrets, rumors of hidden treasure and the surprise of an unexpected romance. Continue reading

Lady Elizabeth: Pride and Prejudice Everything Will Change Book One, by P. O. Dixon – A Preview & Exclusive Excerpt

Lady Elizabeth by PO Dixon x 200For those readers who devour Pride and Prejudice “what-if” stories made famous by authors like Abigail Reynolds, Monica Fairview and Maria Grace, you have come to expect a storyline that will make a sharp left turn from Jane Austen’s original and send you on a new plot path of misunderstanding, prejudice and pride until Elizabeth Bennet and Fitzwilliam Darcy find their happily-ever-after. It amazes me how creative authors can be to re-invent the Lizzy and Darcy love story—so imagine my surprise when I read the description of P. O. Dixon’s new Pride and Prejudice-inspired novel Lady Elizabeth?

Ironically the couple’s social standings are reversed and Elizabeth Bennet is now a Lady of even higher rank than the untitled Fitzwilliam Darcy. Ha! Who will be proud and who will be prejudiced in this diverting paradox? One also wonders out loud what Darcy’s cranky Aunt Catherine de Bourgh will have to complain about now that her nephew is courting a daughter of a peer higher than her own family shades? You will just have to find out for yourself in Dixon’s first book in her new series, Pride and Prejudice Everything Will Change. Here is a brief preview and an exclusive excerpt for your amusement.  Continue reading

Giveaway Winners Announced for The Darcy Brothers Book Launch Party

The Darcy Brothers by Monica Fairview, Maria Grace, Cassandra Grafton, Susan Mason-Milks and Abigail ReynoldsIt’s time to announce the winners of the giveaway prizes for The Darcy Brothers book launch party. The lucky winners drawn at random are:

One copy of The Darcy Brothers (print or eBook)

  • Darah Gill who left a comment on Feb 10, 2015
  • Rosa Penco who left a comment on Feb 02, 2015
  • Marilee who left a comment on Feb 06, 2015

The Grand Prize winner (Jane Austen-themed ensemble of prizes)

  • Wendy Roberts who left a comment on Feb 02, 2015

Congratulations ladies! To claim your prize, please contact me with your full name, address and if you would like a print or digital copy of the book by February 18, 2015 or you will forfeit your prize!

Thanks to all who left comments and to White Soup Press for the giveaways.

Cheers, Laurel Ann

Cover image courtesy of White Soup Press © 2015; text Laurel Ann Nattress © 2015, Austenprose.com

Life in an Eighteenth Century Country House, by Peter and Carolyn Hammond – A Review

Life in a Eighteenth Century Country House Peter and Carolyn Hammond x 200From the desk of Tracy Hickman:

The Grove was a large country house and estate in Chiswick, England owned by Humphrey Morice, the son a highly successful London merchant and slave trader. Morice was an animal lover, and in contrast to the common practices of his day, did not destroy animals that were unable to work any longer. He kept a number of horses, dogs, and other animals at Grove House, causing many of his contemporaries to consider him an eccentric.

The main attraction of Life in an Eighteenth Century Country House is the series of letters written by head groom Will Bishop to Morice during his stay in Italy from 1782-1785. Bishop wrote regularly to his employer, sending detailed accounts of all the bills for the house and stables for Morice’s approval. This was unusual, as most estate owners employed a “man of business” to handle these matters. As head groom, Bishop was mostly concerned with the welfare of the animals of the estate and wrote extensively about them, especially those that were unwell. He also kept Morice abreast of the personal lives of the staff, recounting their illnesses and conflicts with other workers, as well as general news about local people Morice would have known. One of my favorites was the “he said, she said” battle in the kitchen between the cook and stable lads: Continue reading