Shamela (Naxos AudioBooks) , by Henry Fielding, read by Clare Corbett  – A Review

Shamela, by Henry Fielding Naxos AudioBooks (2013)From the desk of Br. Paul Byrd, OP:

“In my last [letter] I left off at our sitting down to Supper on our Wedding Night, where I behaved with as much Bashfulness as the purest Virgin in the World could have done. The most difficult Task for me was to blush; however, by holding my Breath, and squeezing my Cheeks with my Handkerchief, I did pretty well” (297).

Reading Samuel Richardson’s novel Pamela, Or, Virtue Rewarded, as I recounted in my previous review of it, is not for the faint of heart; but I am happy to say that it was all made worthwhile just this past week as I listened to a Naxos AudioBooks recording of Henry Fielding’s masterful parody fittingly entitled Shamela. Many know Fielding for Tom Jones, but his satirical powers are at full and outrageous height in Shamela. In a quarter of the number of pages found in the original story, Fielding highlights and lampoons all of Richardson’s characteristic tropes, transforming Miss Pamela Andrews from a paragon of female virtue into an archetypical scheming hussy. The great irony is that, as shamefully vicious as Shamela maybe, she is a great deal more fun to listen to than her saintly prototype. Continue reading

Pamela, or Virtue Rewarded (Naxos AudioBooks), by Samuel Richardson, read by Clare Corbett – A Review

Pamela, by Samuel Richardson, Naxos AudioBooks (2013)From the desk of Br. Paul Byrd, OP:

Her knowledge of Richardson’s works was such as no one is likely again to acquire, now that the multitude and the merits of our light literature have called off the attention of readers from that great master.” – J.E. Austen-Leigh, Memoir of Jane Austen, ch. 5

Listed among Jane Austen’s most beloved authors is the rebellious printer-turned-novelist Samuel Richardson, creator of such potboilers as Pamela, or Virtue Rewarded (1740). The novel opens at the death of Pamela Andrew’s employer, the woman who has educated her to be as accomplished as any young woman could hope to be, by eighteenth century standards. And from there commences a rather strange and disturbing plot in which Pamela must fend off the unwanted advances of her new male employer—and I’m not simply talking about sexual harassment, which would have been bad enough; I’m talking about outright attempted rape. Indeed, the main dramatic question of the novel is whether Pamela will forfeit her honor (read “her virginity”) for the sake of wealth and safety, or will she display a heroic level of Christian virtue, and risk the possibility of public disgrace. Spoiler Alert: the novel’s subtitle gives the answer away from the start. Continue reading

Giveaway Winner Announced for The Mysteries of Udolpho

The Mysteries of Udolpho: A Romance, by Ann Radcliffe (2008)30 of you left comments qualifying you for a chance to win a copy of the Oxford Worlds Classics edition of The Mysteries of Udolpho, by Ann Radcliffe. The winner drawn at random is Miss Kathleen who left a comment on August 12, 2011.

Congratulations Kathleen! To claim your prize, please contact me with your full name and address by August 24th, 2011. Shipment is to US and Canadian addresses only.

Thanks to our reviewer Br. Paul who helped me understand the novel a bit better, and to all who left comments, but especially to Henry Tilney for his enthusiastic recommendation of the book.

© 2007 – 2011 Laurel Ann Nattress, Austenprose

Group Read of Evelina by Frances Burney Begins Today at The Duchess of Devonshire’s Gossip Guide

Evelina Group Read Banner June 2011Head’s up for literature lovers. The Duchess of Devonshire’s Gossip Guide to the 18th Century Blog is hosting a group read of Evelina or the History of a Young Lady’s Entrance into the World, by Frances Burney during the month of June, 2011.

Evelina is an epistolary novel in three volumes written by English novelist, diarist and playwright Frances Burney (1752-1840). First published anonymously in 1778, Evelina is considered a sentimental novel influenced by the cult of sensibility and part of the early romantic movement. With it’s cutting satire of eighteenth-century society, many scholars view it as a “significant precursor to later works by Jane Austen and Maria Edgeworth, whose novels explore many of the same issues.”

We know that Jane Austen read Evelina and other works by Fanny Burney from her mention of them in her letters. Of particular note is a passage from June 2, 1799 to her sister Cassandra illustrating Jane’s frequent use of hilarious sarcasm.  She is writing of news from her journey and stay in Bath, updating her sister on her social activities and the people she has met.

I spent friday evening with the Mapletons, & was obliged to submit to being pleased inspite of my inclination. We took a very charming walk from 6 to 8 up Beacon Hill, & across some fields to the Village of Charlcombe, which is sweetly situated in a little green Valley, as a Village with such a name ought to be. – Marianne is sensible & intelligent, and even Jane considering how fair she is, is not unpleasant. We had a Miss North & a Mr. Gould of our party; – the latter walked home with me after Tea; – he is a very Young Man, just entered Oxford, wears Spectacles, & has heard that Evelina was written by Dr. Johnson.

One can only imagine the intense personal amusement that Jane Austen received by this Young Man’s mention of Dr. Johnson, (Samuel Johnson, poet, essayist, moralist, literary critic, biographer, editor and esteemed author of A Dictionary of English Language (1755)) as the author of a work of fiction concerning the natural born daughter of dissipated English aristocrat. Oh, the irony of it!!!

Evelina has been on the top of my TBR (to be read) pile for quite possibly as long as it takes to age a fine wine. It intrigued me immediately because it was one of the novels that Jane Austen had read that influenced her writing. I had also read Claire Harman’s biography of Frances Burney many years ago. With honorable intentions I had purchased the Oxford World’s Classics edition and read the excellent introduction by Vivien Jones. That’s as far as I got. Then I downloaded Girlebooks ebook edition of the novel hoping that the convenience of having it on my Nook digital reader would do the trick. Now Heather of The Duchess of Devonshire’s Gossip Guide is offering this wonderful guided group read every Thursday in June with posts and discussions of the letters all planned out and convenient. How can I pass it up? Here is the schedule:

  • 2 June: Volume 1 Letters 1-20
  • 9 June: Volume 1 Letter 21- Volume 2 Letter 6 (21-37)
  • 16 June: Volume 2 Letter 7- 22 (38-53)
  • 23 June: Volume 2 Letter 23- Volume 3 Letter 9 (54-71)
  • 30 June: Volume 3 Letter 10-23 (72-84)

Today Heather has posted the first group summary and discussion. There is also great giveaway of the Oxford World’s Classic edition of Evelina for those participating in the salon-style group read. Please join in!

Cheers, Laurel Ann

© 2007 – 2011 Laurel Ann Nattress, Austenprose