Pride’s Prejudice: A Novel, by Misty Dawn Pulsipher – A Review

Pride's Prejudice by Misty Dawn Pulispher 2014 x 200From the desk of Kimberly Denny-Ryder:

We all make first impressions. Every time we meet a stranger we immediately form an initial opinion, whether it be good, bad, objective, subjective, or any other form. Sometimes, after meeting this person, his/her actions fall so far opposite to your initial impression that it simply astounds you. I myself am guilty of developing a wrong first impression. When I first met my husband, I felt he was a bit odd. Yet here we are, still blissfully happy after 9 years! Anyway, back to wrong first impressions. Such was the case with Beth Pride in Pride’s Prejudice by Misty Dawn Pulsipher, who after seeing a handsome man at a benefit auction soon realized he was in fact an arrogant and selfish idiot. Does her original assessment do William Darcy justice? First, some backstory:

At the Hartford College Children’s Benefit Auction, a chance to dance with Beth, along with other women in attendance, is auctioned off. Dejected after no one bids on her, her hopes are lifted when Darcy steps forward, only to be crushed shortly thereafter when he pays the bid and leaves her, telling her he only felt sorry for her. She then decides to never speak to this man again, but sadly her plans are foiled when her roommate Jenna begins to date Darcy’s best friend, Les. While they are again thrust into each other’s company, Beth continues to try and keep up her hatred of Darcy, but his looks and surprising banter make a serious attempt at breaking down that wall. She begins to rethink her original assessment of Darcy, but doesn’t want to fall for this handsome man a second time without seriously thinking it through. Will Beth’s pride (no pun intended) keep her from letting her true feelings out, or can she learn to trust this man who she up until recently has sworn off?

When I first started reading this novel, the writing voice was a bit odd. The book changes tenses from using pronouns to describe the characters to using their names. After a few chapters, however, this change seemed to be for the better and became permanent, and I began to become more involved in the story. One of my favorite aspects of Pulsipher’s story is that she was able to take events that would be difficult to translate now (i.e. Jane can’t leave Netherfield Park due to her cold) and believably contemporize them. For example, the above storyline turned into a sprained ankle on a camping trip that kept all of the characters in a centralized location due to a mudslide on a mountain.

While there were editing issues (namely continuity) I really enjoyed the work as a whole and got really involved in William & Beth and Les & Jenna’s stories. Darcy wins the prize at being my favorite character of the novel because of his snark. He knows that he doesn’t have a shot at getting Beth’s attention by normal means, so he decides to try and win her by alternative means:

“Dude.” Les said in an accusatory tone. “You’re shooting yourself in the foot.”

“Nope,” William said in a firm tone, swigging his water generously. “I’m coming in at an angle.”

“You honestly think she’s ever going to like you if you keep this up?”

“I’m not into the ‘liking’ phase of my plan yet. Right now I’m on ‘getting her attention even if it’s negative.’”

“She’s going to hate you,” Les said candidly.

“She already does. But love and hate have a common denominator: passion.” (67-68)

Additionally, it should be noted that this is a very clean story, with no premarital sex as the characters don’t believe in it. I thought that this was interesting considering the more modern trends in today’s literature. It’s not often that you read a story centered around 20-somethings that share such views. I’ve read other stories like this that rang as unbelievable and difficult for me to enjoy, but Pulsipher deserves kudos for implementing it in a realistic fashion. I won’t reveal why Darcy feels the way he feels as it is a major spoiler, but it makes his lifestyle choice believable, understandable, and downright chivalrous. If you’re in the mood for an engaging contemporary version of Pride and Prejudice, give Pride’s Prejudice a try this summer.

3 out of 5 Stars

Pride’s Prejudice: A Novel, by Misty Dawn Pulsipher
CreateSpace (2013)
Trade paperback (312) pages
ISBN: 978-1484917848

Additional Reviews:

Cover image courtesy of CreateSpace © 2013; text Kimberly Denny-Ryder © 2014, Austenprose.com

Disclosure of Material Connection: We received one review copy from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. We only review or recommend products we have read or used and believe will be a good match for our readers. We are disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.

3 thoughts on “Pride’s Prejudice: A Novel, by Misty Dawn Pulsipher – A Review

  1. I’ve had this on my radar for a while now, glad you found it enjoyable. I like snarkiness too! Love the quote! The “I’m coming in at an angle.” caught me! Thanks for the review, Kimberly!

    Like

  2. Pingback: Where You Been!? | Reflections of a Book Addict

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