A Social History of Tea: Expanded 2nd Edition, by Jane Pettigrew & Bruce Richardson – A Review

A Social History of Tea 2013Tea passed pleasantly, and nobody seemed in a hurry to move. – Jane Austen, Emma, Chapter 41

Taking tea is so quintessentially British. You cannot think of that noble nation without envisioning its residents with a tea cup in one hand and a cucumber sandwich in the other. English novelist Jane Austen mentions tea no less than 49 times in her major works. The popularity of tea has grown even more since her Regency times, evolving during the Victorian era into a light meal served at four in the afternoon: resplendent with white linen, silver trays, scones and clotted cream. Today, in our fast-paced-world of takeout food and frozen dinners, attending a tea party at a friend’s home or tea room is an event to be cherished and savored. The calming ritual and lively conversation is the ultimate indulgence that has not changed for polished society for four hundred years.

The tale of tea is a captivating story revealed in A Social History of Tea, a new expanded second edition by British tea authority Jane Pettigrew and American tea historian Bruce Richardson. Originally published in 2001 by The National Trust, this new edition has been revised and expanded and includes the research of two tea authorities from both sides of the pond. We are so internationally bipartisan these days—I am sure that mad King George III must be rolling in his grave!

The Tea Garden, by George Morland 1790

The Tea Garden, by George Morland 1790

Having long been a “tea advocate” I knew of Mr. Richardson from my cherished subscription to TeaTime magazine. I was thrilled to discover that he would be a speaker at the 2013 Jane Austen Society of North America’s Annual General Meeting in Minneapolis. I missed his talk, Society Steeped in Tea, but glowing reports piqued my interest in obtaining a copy of his new book with Pettigrew. I was not disappointed. Beautifully designed with 150 full color images, this tome on the evolution of tea through the last four centuries and its influence on society and world economics is fascinating. Broken down into an introduction, six major chapters, a select bibliography, a list of illustration credits and an index, readers can easily use A Social History of Tea as either an illustrated history, a reference book, or purely a pleasure read, depending on their mood. Being a Janeite, I jumped to the index and skimmed for Jane Austen’s name. Huzzah. There she is on page 127 in a featurette entitled Tea in Literature with Charles Dickens and Lewis Carroll, two other famous British authors from the 1800’s who show that taking tea was an excellent way to bring characters together in a prudential parlor or at a mad tea party. Several passages illustrating Austen’s use of “tea-things” by her characters are featured from her novels, and if we pay attention, the timing of when they are taking tea gives us a social insight into when it was drunk and what was served with it.

The next opening of the door brought something more welcome: it was for the tea–things, which she had begun almost to despair of seeing that evening…Fanny was very thankful. She could not but own that she should be very glad of a little tea, and Susan immediately set about making it, as if pleased to have the employment all to herself…Fanny’s spirit was as much refreshed as her body; her head and heart were soon the better for such well–timed kindness.” – Mansfield Park, Chapter 38

The East India Company, London, by Thomas Malton the Younger ca 1800

 The East India Company building in London, ca 1800

Richly detailed and agreeably accessible, A Social History of Tea is both enlightening and entertaining. Every important historical, economic and social aspect is covered. I particularly appreciated the details surrounding the forming and growth of The East India Trading Company, the Boston Tea Party of 1773 which sparked the American Revolution, and the rise of tea rooms suitable for respectable ladies to dine out at the end of the nineteenth century. We can also thank the Victorian’s for raising tea-time to an art form chock-full of the incredibly delicious fare we enjoy today.

Tea at the London Ritz Hotel 2014

Tea at the London Ritz  Hotel 2014

In Jane Austen’s world “tea meant rest and pleasure, and its absence would be a severe disappointment.” (127) Pettigrew and Richardson have combined detailed history, social asides and beautiful illustrations covering the four centuries that we have enjoyed tea—its rise and fall in popularity—and rebirth. A Social History of Tea is the resource for those who would like to discover even more about this delectable beverage. There is a guaranteed abundance of rest and pleasure on every page. I recommend it highly.

5 out of 5 Regency Stars

A Social History of Tea: Expanded 2nd Edition, by Jane Pettigrew & Bruce Richardson
Benjamin Press Publishing (2013)
Paperback (248) pages
ISBN: 978-0983610625

Cover image courtesy of Benjamin Press Publishing © 2013; text Laurel Ann Nattress © 2014, Austenprose.com

5 thoughts on “A Social History of Tea: Expanded 2nd Edition, by Jane Pettigrew & Bruce Richardson – A Review

  1. This sounds like it would be an interesting companion book to For All the Tea in China by Sarah Rose, which tells how the East India Company perpetrated one of the first instances of corporate espionage by sending spies to China to steal, not only the secrets of tea processing, but even the plants!

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  2. Love this book Laurel Ann! – very glad to see it is out in a 2nd ed. I did hear Mr. Richardson in Minneapolis and he was, as expected, delightful. Nothing better than Tea in my mind, so I might have to add this to my collection, even though I have (and treasure) the 1st ed… Thank you for this fine review!

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  3. What a fun book! I love that there is a blog that reviews topics important to me! Tea is definitely important. We were lucky enough to have a tea room in our city for many years, and we are still mourning its passing. This book might cheer me up, though!

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