A Light, Bright, and Sparkling Pride and Prejudice Anniversary Celebration & Giveaway

Mr. Darcy & Elizabeth Bennet, Pride and Prejudice (1995)Huzzah Janeites! Today is the 200th anniversary of the publication of Jane Austen’s classic novel Pride and Prejudice. *throws confetti*

The exact day of publication of Pride and Prejudice is uncertain, but we do know from Austen’s personal correspondence that she had received her own copy from her publisher by January 27, 1813, and the London newspaper The Morning Chronicle announced Pride and Prejudice as ‘Published this Day’ on 28 January 1813. So, that is the date that scholars have accepted.

You will see all sorts of media coverage this week, including this BBC news article, and many others about this worldwide celebration, but the Jane Austen blogosphere is having their own party in honor of this fabulous novel with a Blog Hop hosted by Courtney at Stiletto Storytime and author Alyssa Goodnight. See the great list of giveaways that we are offering to readers below!

If you would like your celebration of Pride and Prejudice to continue, please join us here at Austenprose for The Pride and Prejudice Bicentenary Challenge 2013. We are reading the classic novel and exploring many of the many novels, books, movies and entertainments that it has inspired with a monthly review and discussion. It’s totally free and guaranteed fun.

A GRAND CELEBRATORY GIVEAWAY

Pride and Prejudice (Naxos Young Adult Classics), by Jane Austen, read by Jenny Agutter (2009)Enter a chance to win one of eight books available by leaving a comment sharing your story of your first impressions of Pride and Prejudice or if you have not read it yet, why you would like to by 11:59 PT, Wednesday, February 6, 2013. Winners to be announced on Thursday, February 7, 2013. Shipment to US addresses only.

© 2013 Laurel Ann Nattress, Austenprose

106 thoughts on “A Light, Bright, and Sparkling Pride and Prejudice Anniversary Celebration & Giveaway

    • I was introduced to Pride and Prejudice by borrowing the 1995 miniseries from the library. I had already fallen in love with Sense and Sensibility (through the 1995 film and then the novel) and was eager for more Austen. Obviously, I was not to be disappointed! I loved Elizabeth’s spirit and confidence.

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  1. I didn’t see how Darcy was going to get himself out of the hole he dug when he asked Elizabeth to marry him. He insulted her more than anything. But I loved the way he redeemed himself. It’s the one book I wished I could read again for the first time.

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  2. I actually read PRIDE AND PREJUDICE for the first time when I was around 13 years old and simply enjoyed the romance aspects of the story; needless to say I didn’t really appreciate it until I was much older. Now that I’m much older and re-read it I find myself amazed that somethings never change, such as our ability to judge solely on our first impressions or allow our ingrained prejudices to shade our opinions.

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  3. Darcy’s proposal is a highlight, I agree. For all the things about it that could insult, what rises above was the vulnerability. Exactly opposite what Elizabeth had been seeing – or using as a defense. And then throw in all the wild fun of the ‘ensemble cast’.

    It amazes me over and over again to consider the Austen inspired world we live in–all from a young, single woman who struggled with so little reward for her work.

    Laurel Ann, thanks for all you do to be a part of that!

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  4. My first impression was seeing Colin Firth’s P&P home sick from school. It ended at proposal scene and I had to find out what happened next, unfortunately i got well and had to go to school the next day. :)

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  5. I distinctly remember being dismayed upon learning that I would be “forced” to read P&P my sophomore year of high school. Like many of my peers, I assumed it would be yet another tedious, required reading assignment. How little I knew! I ended up falling for Austen’s prose right away; her wit and the beauty of her narrative (I’m a sucker for that Regency dialect) stole my attention and didn’t let go until the final sentence. I was particularly enthralled by Darcy’s letter of explanation, so awkwardly handed off in the woods beyond Hunsford – I actually highlighted the entire letter in my first copy (which I still have, and which is much loved these almost-ten years later).

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  6. I delighted in Elizabeth’s cleverness and envied her relationship with her sister Jane the first time I read P&P.. I always wanted a sister! But my favorite part is always the moment Elizabeth sees him at Pemberley where she’s come with her Aunt and Uncle. How he is so kind and cordial. And you think, now HERE is a Darcy to love!

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  7. I came late in life to this dinner party! A few years ago my daughter made me read Twilight the series and The main character kept talking about Jane Austen’s characters and how the were her fav books. So I decided to go back and reread the classics(that I was forced to in school), apparently I wasn’t paying attention the first time because if I was I would of been a fan for years. When I finally reread the P&P book a few years ago I think I just kept rereading it every other month. I think I was possessed. So here I am A JAFF addict and loving it!!

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  8. I think I have always loved Jane Austen and Pride and Prejudice in particular. I can’t remember not loving Mr Darcy. *sigh*

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  9. I’m not a native english speaker, so I’ll write it in my language. I’m so excited for this day.
    Leí el libro hace algunos años y me gusto. Que me sintiera un poco identificada con Elizabeth Bennet fue el comienzo, pero la necesidad de saber mas sobre Dr. Darcy es lo que me hizo leer el libro y escuchar el audio-libro mas de 20 veces.
    La naturalidad con la que se desarrolla la historia, la época y los bellos personajes ♥ Jane Austen nos abrió el mundo a muchas mujeres con el prototipo de hombre que es Mr. Darcy, y que a pesar de sus 200 años nos sigue gustando ya sea Colin Firth, Matthew Macfadyen o Daniel Gordh quien lo interpreten.
    Thank you so much Miss Austen.

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    • ¡Es la verdad que Sr. Darcy es un misterio que quieres a resolver. Mantengas esperas por la “Verdad Darcy” a ser revelado, y con la carta – allí está!

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  10. I was in my 60′s before I even knew who Jane Austen was! I’ve since read P & P several times and each read reveals gems of wit and wisdom. What young man would want to marry an air-head or silly woman when there are Miss Elizabeths out there to be courted? She is my all-time favorite fictional heroine and is the perfect balance of feminine charm and independent intelligence. Ch 60 sums up her admirable qualities. “……Elizabeth’s spirits soon rising to playfulness again, she wanted Mr. Darcy to account for his having ever fallen in love with her…..” (She then proceeds to tell Mr Darcy why) What a lady!

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  11. I was so stunned that so many people could dismiss this book as nothing more than a sweet little romance — to me, while P&P is absolutely a magnificent romance, it is also such a witty and touching comment upon the very fragile, fraught world of feminine propriety. Every time I read it, I’m saddened when spunky Charlotte Lucas marries for safety, but I can’t fault her for it when her options are so few and so unappealing. And the fine line that society expects Jane to walk — don’t reveal your feelings, but let them be known lest you seem uninterested — is so harsh, too!

    So by the time Elizabeth refuses Darcy, I was shocked. I was also in awe at the backbone that would have taken. I admire Elizabeth for putting principle ahead of pocketbook.

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    • I know how you feel, although I think the reflections on all of the different placements and nuances of society are the most important parts of the story. All-in-all, my all-time favorite novel.

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  12. My first encounter with P&P was with the miniseries. My mom would let me watch movies with her when I was growing up, and we watched this one together when I was about 12 or 13, and I read it not long after. Sometimes I wonder if she had me watch it since I was getting near the dating age, to help direct me towards the Darcys of the world rather than the Wickhams! :)

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  13. Back when the newer P&P came out, I wanted to see it. But I wanted to read the book first, so I got it from the library. It was my first time reading any kind of classic literature, so it took me a while to get a hang of the language and phrases. I was really thankful for all of the notes in the back! :) But I completely fell in love with the story and it’s been my favorite book ever since. {The Keira Knightley P&P also happens to be my favorite movie.}

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  14. My first impression of P & P was much like Miss Bennet’s first impression of Mr. Darcy. I was disappointed and had a hard time getting into the material. However, I have since developed a deep and profound love for all things Austen with P & P being my favorite.

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  15. P&P left me identifying with Elizabeth and her ups & downs. Love the way she quipped when asked questions meant to “put her in her place”. She used humor sooo well. Her heart was meant for Darcy.
    I read Georgiana’s diary for my January read…….wonderful! I always suspected there was more to her. In the book she struggles with friends & relations trying to match her with a good man. All the while she loves Edward. They have similar misunderstanding as Lizzie & Mr. Darcy. Wonderful read!!

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  16. In 9th grade we watched the 1980 P&P BBC adaptation … and I knew I had to pick up the book immediately. From beginning to end, I was enthralled by the chemistry between Elizabeth and Mr. Darcy. Every time I pick it up now, I find another aspect of the book to love.

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  17. Like Charlene, I “came late to this dinner party.” Don’t recall ever being required to read P&P, and am not certain why I chose to add it (and several other classics) to my recently acquired Kindle. However, I thoroughjly enjoyed my first reading, am certain it will not be my last, and I have since acquired (and read) seven “sequels” to P&P. And then I discovered “Austenprose” and joined the Regency Romance Reading Challenge. My question now is “will I also be able to complete the Bicentenary Challenge?” and yes, I think I’ll go there next. After all these years of being an addict of regency and historical romances, I think I may now officially a “Janeite.”

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  18. So excited about everything that’s going on in the media today and this week for the anniversary. A buffet of riches for Janeites!

    My very first exposure to P&P was when I saw the 1995 BBC adaptation. I think it was sometime around 2003 or 2004. As I love to check out books that are made into movies, this drove me to investigate Jane. I’ve been in love ever since!

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  19. To be perfectly honest my first impression was not a positive one. I was a moody young teenager who preferred the dark Thomas Hardy. It wasn’t until I was a grown woman and saw Joe Wright’s 2005 movie version that spurred in me all things Austen. I didn’t remember that morning field scene so I read the original P&P and was hooked. I then read all the novels, started watching all the different movie versions, was given Pamela Aiden and Linda Berdoll’s books, discovered JAFF online, joined JASNA, attended my first AGM in Canada, then everyone started self publishing, mainstream publishers jumped on board, started writing reviews for Laurel Ann, and the rest is history. (Truly I don’t have a problem… I can stop anytime.)

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    • “…… (Truly I don’t have a problem… I can stop anytime.)……” I love that and wished I’d said it. Hi! My name’s Jeffrey and I’m an Austen-aholic. HI JEFFREY! etc….(somebody please stop me)

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  20. I first read P&P as a HS junior in an English class (almost 40 years ago). I loved the book from the beginning and couldn’t understand why the rest of the class hated it so much! I think the idea that Elizabeth was able to overcome the odds and change her expected life path was inspirational to me as a young girl growing up on a farm in upstate NY.

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  21. I feel bad even saying it–but i started reading pride and prejudice and thought it was boring! Thank heavens I listened to my friend who convinced me to push through and I feel in love with it :)

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  22. I was captivated by the beautiful language Jane Austen used when I first read Pride and Prejudice. Her humor made the biggest impression on me.

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  23. I remember watching Langton’s adaptation (BBC) of Pride and Prejudice on PBS when I was young. I waited every week for the next episode. I was completely lost in the world of Elizabeth Bennet. I wanted to read the book immediately. Not long after, I checked out Ang Lee’s adaptation Sense and Sensibility and used to create grand picnics in our living room in order to entice my younger brother into experiencing the stories with me. My brother actually sat through the film and cheered on Elinor Dashwood at the end. From there, I began checking out other adaptations from the library, of Mansfield Park, Persuasion, and Emma too. My brother and I continued to stage elaborate picnics on the floor of our living room and watch film adaptations for years. It was a way for us to have fun and bond at a time when our family didn’t have much.
    What a wonderful, timeless, writer.

    Thank you, Jane!

    Happy Pride and Prejudice Day, everyone !

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  24. My first impression – loved the humor and cleverness. It made me smile from first line to last, and then I went in search of her other books. I was 12 or 13. P & P is still my favorite novel.

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  25. Most of my life I knew Jane Austen was a “good” author and enjoyed S&S and Emma. However, one Sunday night, everything changed!! I watched the 1995 P&P and bought the book the next day. From that moment, I have been obsessed with JA. I see the genius in all her works now. I appreciate your blog for feeding my “addiction”.

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  26. I fell in love with the characters, the romance of the language and pace of life when I first read Pride & Prejudice early on in high school. From there, I was hooked and had to read the rest of Austen’s work. With the release of TV and movie adaptations when I was in college and my work on one of my degrees, which was English Literature, my love went deeper and since have tried to gobble up any adaptation or spin off I could find. In celebration of P&P’s birthday today, I rounded up every article I could find on my blog to keep the flame alive:

    http://crindalyn.wordpress.com/2013/01/28/happy-birthday-pride-prejudice/

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  27. My first introduction to Pride and Prejudice was by watching the BBC 5 hour version. I fell in love with it right away. Since then I’ve read the book and watched several movie versions. I can’t get enough!

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  28. My first time reading Pride and Prejudice was after I had seen the 1995 version by borrowing it from the base library. I loved it from the beginning! I cringed at Collin’s proposal, mourned over Lydia’s idiocy and rejoiced when Elizabeth and Darcy FINALLY straighten out their communication frustrations! I couldn’t believe that although I had heard of it before, I had never read it.

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  29. I read the book for the first time in college (but for fun, not for class). I had seen snippets of the Colin Firth version. When I first read the book, I got caught up in the story, even thought I knew the outcome. (thank you Nora Ephron for writing You’ve Got Mail!) I thought Elizabeth only married Mr. Darcy because he was a nice guy who cared about her but she didn’t really love him. I worried about her future happiness. The more I read the book, the more I discover and I have revised my opinion to see that Elizabeth truly comes to love Darcy. I became hooked on the beautiful writing style and became a Austen-aholic! (Hi Jeffrey! My name is Pooh Bear and I’m an Austen-aholic!)

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  30. Since my first reading at 13 – given to me by a wise grandmother – P&P has been my favorite novel and a companion throughout my life. Happy Birthday,
    Jane’s “darling child.”

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  31. P&P was the third Austen novel I read, “Sense & Sensibility” and “Emma” being the first two. I read them in high school for fun, not an assignment, and I’m not sure why, but I did not much like P&P the first time I read it. Maybe I found it too romantic? Or maybe I just decided to dislike it because everyone else in the universe liked it — I get stubborn that way sometimes. I read “Persuasion” soon after, and liked it the best of those four.

    I didn’t read it again until last year, with more than 10 years and a lot of learning in between. This time, I laughed and laughed with delight all the way through — it was like reading a different book! I would love to be as witty and sharp as Lizzy, or at the very least to be a friend of hers.

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  32. I have loved this book since my teenage years, and have read it over and over! What struck me the first time, and continues to impress me each and every time I read it, is how clever Austen was with people. She had such a literary grasp of personalities and subtle way with humor.

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  33. The first time I read P&P it was to see how it stood up after zombies because I read Pride and Prejudice and Zombies before I had read the original work by Jane Austen. I’m sure Austen would spin in her grave at that. But I found a story rich with interesting characters and found their varying views on society, marriage, and relationships gave them life. Even those with few spoken lines add to the richness of the story. Now I find myself going back to it just to read passages and meditate on them. I like how so few characters are straight up good or bad, they are nuanced, and you just know that everyone has a back story.

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  34. On my first reading of Pride and Prejudice I was so impressed by Elizabeth. It took me a second reading to really forgive Darcy for his behavior toward Lizzy. Maybe I was a little prejudice? :)

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  35. I was captivated with P & P since the classics were introduced to me by mother late mother. What a meaningful and special novel.

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  36. I discovered Jane Austen by accident. I bought a copy of Northanger Abbey from a clearance bookshop when I was a teen. I read it and liked it and looked up the other titles by the author. I can’t even remember when that was or when I read P&P for the first time. I read all of her titles very quickly after that.

    And they never get old! I love re-reading them and all adaptations as well.

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  37. I first read P&P when I was in high school, and it was my first introduction to the Regency world. I enjoyed reading about the customs, the gentility, and the romance. I was struck by Jane Austen’s wit; I remember having to read a few sentences over again, to make sure I had really read what I thought I had read. It was quite a bit wittier than I had expected.

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  38. I picked up P&P in the school library, having finished an assignment or something. I was then late to my next class because when the bell rang I had to go check it out then and there. I fell in love with the characters, the writing style, the story, and just had to know what happened next! So began a lifelong love of Jane Austen.

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  39. I actually remember really disliking the book at first! I had to read it for an English class in high school and I think I disliked it for the sake of disliking any required reading. When I read it again on my own, I fell in love. Thank goodness for second chances!

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  40. My first time reading P&P….I loved Lizzy….I wanted to be like Lizzy…Mr Darcy didn’t really grow on me til I re-read it…and with each rereading…I love it alittle more..

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  41. I was first introduced to Pride and Prejudice at a younger age when my mom had me watch the mini-series version with Jennifer and Colin. It took me a while, I think, to truly appreciate the story for what it was, but I fell in love with it. Pride and Prejudice is also a part of the reason I want to be a historian. I love that time period in history, especially in Great Britain. The manners, the dress, the architecture…I love it all. I’ve probably seen Pride and Prejudice (yes, all five-six hours of the mini series) about thirty or forty times. Absolutely love it, it never gets old.

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  42. I watched the 95 film of P&P a couple times before I read the book and, when I read it, I loved discovering those scenes that weren’t in the movie. Particularly at the end when Lizzy and Darcy were having their “when did you know you loved me?” talk. I was like hey, this is new! lol Each time I read it I see something new that I never noticed before.

    Thanks for the great giveaway and Happy P&P day.

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  43. My first impression of Pride and Prejudice? It wasn’t as good as Jane Eyre. 25 years later, and I realized I was in love with Pride and Prejudice. ‘I was in the middle of it before…’

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  44. I first read Pride and Prejudice in high school. Of all my required reading over the years, P&P remains to date the only one I have read more than once. I honestly can’t recall my first impressions of the story itself, as it’s been over ten years and I’ve read the book so many times since then. But I do remember the fact that the only copy of the book we had in the house was so old it was constantly shedding pages. Now I own several beautiful copies, but that old falling-to-pieces book is my first memory. :)

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  45. I first read P&P as a kids classic version was I was about 10… And fell in love! I picked up the real version, not too long after and have been hooked ever since! Like another commenter, at first it was a simple love story but now I pick up on all the nuances. Plus, it’s endlessly quotable :o)

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  46. I’m not sure…what I remember is reading P&P, despirately hunting for JA other novels, discovering JAFF, movie adaptations, what if’s,….it is a sickness really! I cannot remember life before the affliction. And NO! I do not want the cure!

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  47. I remember thinking how the story seemed simple but yet it was complex in the issues it dealt with. It amazed me how Austen took a complex person and presented it them in a simple manner. I love reading the annotated versions even more because I feel I catch so many more of her nuances that I haven’t before.

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  48. Actually, the first time I was introduced to the story was when I got Pride & Prejudice (2005) on Netflix in 2007. I’d heard of Jane Austen of course and her work, but hadn’t read any of the stories. Once I saw the movie, everything changed. I went out the next day, bought the book, and started reading! I was so happy when I got the B&N book with all seven of her novels for my birthday! I love Pride and Prejudice! I actually re-watched it yesterday!

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  49. I think I first read P&P in my junior year at university. I was a Math major and English minor. I had already taken a course where we read Chaucer in the original Middle English, so I was prepared to cope with non-modern English. I picked up P&P on my own at a used bookshop — it was not assigned reading. I was pleasantly surprised at how refreshing and witty it was — a smoothly enjoyable read. Since then I have re-read it 3 times, including Shepard’s annotated edition. I love the way Jane would sometimes spell a word one way, and then another way pages later. I would NOT want to re-read it with “corrected” or modernized spelling — that would somewhat spoil its charm.

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  50. I found a tattered copy of Pride and Prejudice at a library book-sale in my city. It was about a dollar and I needed something to read the summer before 7th grade. I was an awkward pre-teen and already in the beginning stages of serious book-nerdom. There was something comforting about the story, knowing that a strong-willed, bookish woman could find love. It gave me hope even then, when I could not fully grasp every theme and the historical contexts. I’ve reread that book often and it’s worth more than the change I spent on it. I refuse to read the e-book version, or the newer, more pristine versions friends and family buy. The crinkles in the spine, the writing in the margins and the dusty smell from that first book are all mine, closely intertwined with the pleasure and hopes it continues to give me.

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  51. The first time I read Pride & Prejudice I immediately adored Lizzie, a heroine who wasn’t afraid to be herself and hold out for love. It took me a lot longer to like Darcy — my first time through I was almost at the end before I fell in love with him.

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  52. I love P&P! I remember the first time I watched the 1995 version of the movie I did not realize that it was a 5 hour movie and I would up watching it until around 3 in the morning because I had to find out how the story ended. After that I was hooked. I have read the book as well as several variations and sequels. I have also seen several versions and even introduced my British Literature Student teacher to the 2003 “Pride and Prejudice: A Latter-Day Comedy” version when I was in High School.

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  53. My mother bought a paperback unabridged copy for my eighth birthday and we read a portion of it together out loud each night before bed. I loved it and went on to read it and the other Jane Austen’s by myself as a young teen. I did end up preferring Persuasion after I got through them all. ;D

    Thanks for the giveaway opportunity.

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  54. I had read Sense & Sensibility when I was young (around 12, I think), but didn’t pick up P&P until much later (post-college). I don’t know why I didn’t, because I adored S&S. Finally, I decided it was time to read P&P, and I don’t know how I went so long without reading it! The thing that struck me most upon first read was how accessible the language was. My memories of Austen were of slogging through the language as a preteen, but P&P I think is definitely her most accessible and charming novel. Since then I’ve continued to read Austen novels, and even had a P&P dream last night as if celebrating its anniversary. *laughs*

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  55. I first read it in high school when I was 15. I liked it as a teenager though I thought the language was formal and stiff. In the subsequent years, I have re-read it at least 15 times. And then there was the 1995 movie……. every time I reread it, I find more and more to love and admire. Austen is so subtle and informative yet so smooth and seamless with her writing. It still has so much to say to us today.

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  56. I became hooked when I saw the 1995 version of Pride & Prejudiced 5 years ago; P&P is my favorite and I have read it 6 times and plan to read it 60 more times (at least). I love Jane Austen.

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  57. My first experience reading Pride and Prejudice was when I was 12 years old. My mother put a beautiful edition of the book in my Easter basket. It was too long ago for me to remember my exact impressions, but I do know that I have been in love with it (and Mr. Darcy I might add) ever since. Since that first reading, I have read Pride and Prejudice at least once every year. It also began my love affair with British literature, specifically during the Romanticism/Victorian era. :)

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  58. I actually read all of Jane Austen’s other books before reading Pride and Prejudice. I figured that I knew the story line and basically all the best quotes anyway, since SO many people love it and have quoted it–and besides, what’s so special about Mr. Darcy?!
    But my opinion was completely changed after reading P and P. The wit, romance, action, and, of course, dear Miss Austen’s writing style, made me fall in love with P and P. So now, I am proud to say, I am a fan of Pride and Prejudice! :)

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  59. I, too, came late to the table – very late. I read Pride and Prejudice and fell in love. That led to the BBC film version, then the wonderful annotated edition. I proceeded to read all of Jane Austen’s works and joined JASNA. Now I’ve begun listening to the books, and I’ll read anything Austenesque (some of it is dreadful, most of it is wonderful).

    I’ve become a Janeite, and it was Pride and Prejudice that started it all!

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  60. I will have a longer post about this when i write about P&P for the challenge.

    I was first introduced to P&P when i was home sick with flu and the 1995 version was playing on the tv. I was dozing on and off and missed how it ended. I love the costumes they used in this production and I never found out name of book and author till a few years later

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  61. I’m trying to think back to my first impression! I think I read this way too young initially — 12ish, maybe — and just didn’t get it — although now that I think about it, I was rather taken with the balls and the scandal of Lydia…

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  62. I loved the book the first time I read it, and the 2nd, and the 3rd, and so on. I also listened to it for the first time and enjoyed someone else reading it to me also. I love the movie versions they have put out. Colin Firth as Mr Darcy has always been my favorite. Would love to win. Thanks for the giveaway.

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  63. My first impression was when I was 17 or 18 years old. I read Pride and Prejudice. I fell in love with not only Jane Austen, but many other classic authors. It opened a whole new door to me. But Jane Austen novels will always be my favorite.

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  64. I first read Pride and Prejudice my sophomore year of high school. I plodded through the first 2 or 3 chapters, then realized that it was a romance – my favorite kind of story! I couldn’t put the book down until I had finished it. I bought a used copy the summer after that and read it so often that the binding wore away and i had to replace it. It is, to this day, my all time favorite book. I have replaced it a second time… with the same result, and my sister gifted me with a hard cover version that I have also read multiple times. I am totally emamored with this story and have dvd versions of the Colin Firth BBC movie and the more recent one with Kiera Knightly. I watch the BBC dvd often enough to drive my husband out of the house! I am so glad that I was made to read this wonderful book during my school days, and have been a fan of Jane Austen ever since.

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  65. My first impressions of of Pride and Prejudice were those of a pre-teen who despised all classics, the girly ones in particular, and so refused to even consider reading Jane Austen. Until my mom put on the BBC miniseries one day, and within ten minutes I was in love. Pride and Prejudice was one of the very first books I went out and bought for myself and I’ve read it a ridiculous number of times.

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  66. I read P & P in high school and loved it. I am always impressed by how modern the novels are. Manners have changed, but people are not so different. One from P & P is when Lydia and Kitty cross the street in Meryton ostensibly to go to a shop, but really so they can intercept Denny and learn who the new guy is. Admit it, you know you’ve done it!

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  67. I read P&P a few years ago and I wish I could relive the first time. I’ve read it many times since then and every time I notice something else I hadn’t the time before.

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  68. I had heard of Jane Austen while in high school, but didn’t have any interest in reading her books. After I was married, a friend had a P&P movie night, and when Mr. Darcy aka Colin Firth, gave Elizabeth that smoldering look, I was hooked. The book was procured from the local library the very next day. I have read and re-read the book (I currently have 2 copies on hand). I listen to the audio book version so adeptly read by Karen Savage from Librivox.org about 4 times a year. I LOVE Pride and Prejudice. And now my husband can answer many questions on Jeopardy based on his absorbed knowledge of the world’s favorite authoress…Jane.

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  69. I first read P&P as a teenager devouring classic English literature, but the first
    read I really remember is for a class on the English Novel in college. That was my first recognition of the quality of Jane Austen’s writing – how observant, critical, clever, and amusing she was. It was a transformation in my previous admiration for her only as a story-teller.

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  70. I first read “Pride & Prejudice” at the age of thirteen. It wasn’t my first Austen…”Sense and Sensibility” had that honor. However I remember reading P & P and just knowing from that very first line that it was something truly special…..a work of art. It remains just as awe inspiring today after probably twenty readings as it did that very first time. Thanks for taking part in the anniversary celebration…the only thing better than reading and loving a book with all your heart is knowing you share that love with so many others. Happy 200th P & P!

    Courtney
    Stiletto Storytime

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  72. My first experience with pride and prejudice was when I was a junior in high school and the Colin Firth and Jennifer Ehle miniseries came on public broadcasting. I was immediately ensnared. The story, the characters, the era it all consumed me. I needed more. I simply could not rest until I got my fill. I went to Borders and bought the book. Since that fateful day I have read that book more times than I am able to recollect. It’s moved from Las Vegas to Oregon with me. It’s gone to sunny beaches and poolsides as my faithful companion, never letting me down yet always filling me with as much joy as the first time. It would be very difficult for me to pinpoint any one thing that I love about the novel so I will mention a few of many. I love to immerse myself in the language of the writing and imagine that we still in this time spoke so eloquently all the time. I suffer knowing that love matches were not so common in that time especially among the wealthy, but to know Darcy is so in love that he would risk everything he used to think crucial to share a life with Elizabeth just makes my heart soar. They way they fit so well together and change each other for the better is exactly what anyone can hope for in love…to have your perfect match make you a better person while striving to become a better person for you. There is nothing more I wish for or strive for in my love. This is just a taste of what I feel for Pride and Prejudice.

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  73. Pride & Prejudice was a set book for my English Lit exam when I was 15/16 (back in 1978), so I had to read it, but I am so thankful to whoever it was at the O Level Board of Examinations who chose it for that year’s curriculum!

    First impressions? By the end of the book, I was completely smitten, not only with Darcy and Elizabeth, but with Jane Austen’s writing. Mesmerised by her way with words, her wit and language, her characters and her story, I fled to the nearest library and read my way through everything she had written that was out there at the time!

    Here I am, 35 years later, as much in love with Darcy and Jane Austen as ever, and delighted to have such a lovely, heart-warming, generous-natured and talented online community to share my love with!

    Cassie (who is in the UK but has many friends in the US who would happily take delivery, if she is fortunate enough to win anything!)

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  74. My private Wyoming school was tiny, and the school library even tinier. On a whim one day when I was 12, I grabbed a blue hardcover copy of P&P off the shelves … and fell in love. I had expected it to be slow and boring — and instead I found biting wit and humorous narrative. Among Austen’s works, it’s my second favorite (I adore “Persuasion”), but it’s a close second.

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  75. I was diagnosed with ADD in my early 20′s and P&P was the first book I ever read cover to cover after I started meds. It truely started my love affair with reading!!

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  76. Have never read it. Seen on film and stage, but stopped reading in 5th grade when a teacher told me “count of monte cristo” was too hard for me, enough though I was over 25% through the book. Therefore, never read many of the “classics”, read lots these days, but still need to get to the classics

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  77. I read P & P after seeing the movie starring Laurence Olivier and Greer Garson (1940); a beautifully filmed black & white classic on TCM. I bought a paperback of all the JA books together and spent the next year reading them all. P & P is my favorite. Then when Colin Firth & Jennifer Ehle recreated my favorite sparring partners, I fell in love with P & P all over again.

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  78. I can’t remember a time when I didn’t love Pride and Prejudice but honestly I think I have only read it through completely one time. I love the story and I love the adaptations in the movies. Of course, if I find an author has a book out with a version of the title or a mention in a review says it is comparable to P&P then I’m all over it. I spent a lot of years comparing the men in my novels to Darcy but then I read Persuasion and absolutely fell in love with Captain Wentworth. Now my “fantasy guy” is a combined version of them both. Jane Austen is definitely one of my Fantasy dinners with 5 famous people. I’d love nothing better than to spend an evening sitting with her watching others at ball or party to hear what tales she’d weave of the events. I have already completed one book in the reading challenge this year (and of course have watched 2 movies!). Excited to for Austenland to come out later this year!

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  79. I first read P&P in high school. My beloved great aunt introduced it to me. I remember thinking Mr. Darcy was so romantic – all smoldering and tall-dark-and-handsome. He eventually became the pattern I based my romantic ideals on in life. I married a Mr. Darcy and realized that mine had not gone through a dramatic change of heart, but was still hard-hearted and aloof (as well as tall-dark-and-handsome). It has taken 28 years for that transformation — and it is not yet complete. But I am still working on it and hoping that one day “my” Mr. Darcy will redeem himself as completely as Elizabeth’s.

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  80. I am ashamed to say I haven’t read this BUT I didn’t appreciate books as a kid but now that I do I have a ton of classic books to catch up on including this one.

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  81. The thing about Jane….her humor. I remember smiling and giggling all the way through the book. Her wit and charm just ooze off the page. One of my favorite parts about Pride and Prejudice is poor Miss Bingley. Jane takes such subtle pokes at her and her overt attempts to worm her way into Darcy’s heart. I hate her…. but I almost feel sorry for her, too.

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  82. My first meeting with Pride and Prejudice was watching the 1940 movie with my grandmother one summer between years in junior high. I loved the humor and costumes and storyline. High school brought the book as an assignment my freshman year and I was completely surprised at the difference between the movie I had watched and what I was now reading (as can be said for many a movie based on a book). The beautiful prose, the clever dialog and wordplay, and the variety of characters in the novel thoroughly captured my attention. A friend convinced me to watch the 1995 miniseries, albeit in 2003, and I began to believe in the occasional goodness of adaptations for the screen again. I have spent each Christmas since 1990 roving from Longbourn to Pemberley and back again, keeping company with my favorite characters, insinuating myself into there lives on both page and screen, as a special holiday treat to myself.

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  83. Delighted to see my book MR DARCY’S DREAM on your list – just one quibble. my name is Aston, not Ashton. Actually, it’s a pen name, but not chosen because it’s like Austen. It’s my husband’s name – I kept my maiden name of Edmondson when I married. So I write under both names.
    Love this site, Laurel Ann – thank you for all your great Jane Austen work.

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  84. I first read Pride and Prejudice at 8 years old when I stayed with my aunt, a school administrator while my parents were in Germany for a conference. She had bookshelves on 2 walls of the guest roomand had heard to Jane Austen so read it. Also read Frankenstein and scared myself into nightmares. But I LOVED Pride and Prejudice and that started me on a life long read and re-read of Jane Austen’s novels and related.

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  85. At first I found the language a bit difficult. It was hard to figure out what they meant because they sort of circled around things. Watching the movies and reading the sequels helped me understand the books & Regency-style language more. I got interested in Austen when they had an Austenfest on P.B.S. about five years ago and showed lots of Austen movies.

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